topical

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topical

 [top´ĭ-kal]
pertaining to a particular area, such as a topical antiinfective agent applied to a certain area of the skin and affecting only the area to which it is applied.

erythromycin (topical)

Akne-Mycin, A/T/S, E-Glades, E-Solve 2, Erycette, Eryderm, Erygel, Sans-Acne (CA), Stiemycin (UK)

Pharmacologic class: Macrolide

Therapeutic class: Anti-infective

Pregnancy risk category B

Action

Binds with 50S subunit of susceptible bacterial ribosomes, suppressing protein synthesis in bacterial cells and causing cell death

Availability

erythromycin base

Capsules (delayed-release): 250 mg

Ointment (ophthalmic): 0.5%

Tablets: 250 mg, 500 mg

Tablets (delayed-release, enteric-coated): 250 mg, 333 mg, 500 mg

Tablets (particles in tablets): 333 mg, 500 mg

erythromycin ethylsuccinate

Oral suspension: 200 mg/5 ml, 400 mg/5 ml

Powder for suspension: 100 mg/2.5 ml, 200 mg/5 ml, 400 mg/5 ml Tablets: 400 mg

erythromycin lactobionate

Powder for injection: 500 mg, 1 g

erythromycin stearate

Tablets (film-coated): 250 mg, 500 mg

erythromycin (topical)

Gel: 2%

Ointment: 2%

Solution: 2%

Swabs: 2%

Indications and dosages

Pelvic inflammatory disease

Adults: 500 mg (base) I.V. q 6 hours for 3 days, then 250 mg (base, estolate, or stearate) or 400 mg (ethylsuccinate) q 6 hours for 7 days

Syphilis

Adults: 500 mg (base, estolate, or stearate) P.O. q.i.d. for 14 days

Most upper and lower respiratory tract infections; otitis media; skin infections; Legionnaires' disease

Adults: 250 mg P.O. q 6 hours, or 333 mg P.O. q 8 hours, or 500 mg P.O. q 12 hours (base, estolate, or stearate); or 400 mg P.O. q 6 hours or 800 mg P.O. q 12 hours (ethylsuccinate); or 250 to 500 mg I.V. (up to 1 g) q 6 hours (gluceptate or lactobionate)

Children: 30 to 50 mg/kg/day (base, estolate, ethylsuccinate, or lactobionate) I.V. or P.O., in divided doses q 6 hours when giving I.V. and q 6 to 8 hours when giving P.O. Maximum dosage is 2 g/day for base or estolate, 3.2 g/day for ethylsuccinate, and 4 g/day for lactobionate.

Intestinal amebiasis

Adults: 250 mg (base, estolate, or stearate) or 400 mg (ethylsuccinate) P.O. q 6 hours for 10 to 14 days

Children: 30 to 50 mg/kg/day (base, estolate, ethylsuccinate, or stearate) P.O. in divided doses over 10 to 14 days

Prophylaxis of ophthalmia neonatorum caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Chlamydia trachomatis

Neonates: 0.5- to 1-cm ribbon of ointment into each lower conjunctival sac once

Treatment of conjunctivitis of the newborn caused by susceptible organisms

Neonates: 50 mg/kg/day (ethylsuccinate) P.O. in four divided doses for at least 14 days

Pertussis

Children: 40 to 50 mg/kg/day (estolate preferred) P.O. in four divided doses for 14 days

Pneumonia of infancy

Infants: 50 mg/kg/day (estolate or ethylsuccinate) P.O. in four divided doses for at least 3 weeks

Acne

Adults and children older than age 12: 2% ointment, gel, or solution applied topically b.i.d.

top·i·cal

(top'i-kăl),
Relating to a definite place or locality; local.
[G. topikos, fr. topos, place]

topical

/top·i·cal/ (top´ĭ-k'l) pertaining to a particular area, as a topical antiinfective applied to a certain area of the skin and affecting only the area to which it is applied.

topical

(tŏp′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
Medicine Relating to, applied to, or affecting a localized area of the body, especially of the skin: a topical anesthetic.
n.
A topical anesthetic.

top′i·cal′i·ty (-kăl′ĭ-tē) n.
top′i·cal·ly adv.

topical

[top′ikəl]
Etymology: Gk, topos, place
1 pertaining to the surface of a part of the body.
2 pertaining to a drug or treatment applied topically.

topical

adjective Local, focal, superficial; referring to a body surface

top·i·cal

(top'i-kăl)
Relating to a definite place or locality; local.
[G. topikos, fr. topos, place]

topical

Pertaining to something, usually medication, applied to a surface on or in the body, rather than taken internally or injected. Examples of topical applications are skin ointments or creams, eye and ear drops or ointments and vaginal pessaries.

Topical

A term used to describe medicine that has effects only in a specific area, not throughout the body, particularly medicine that is put directly on the skin.

topical

local

topical,

adj pertaining to the outer surface.

top·i·cal

(top'i-kăl)
Relating to a definite place or locality, anatomic or geographic; local.
[G. topikos, fr. topos, place]

topical,

adj 1. of or pertaining to the surface of a part of the body.
2. of or pertaining to a drug or treatment applied to the surface of a part of the body.
topical anesthesia,

topical

pertaining to a particular area, as a topical anti-infective applied to a certain area of the skin and affecting only the area to which it is applied.

topical agent
a pharmaceutical preparation for topical application.

Patient discussion about topical

Q. Your topic-manager: Did you have today a little crisis like me? As some of you already know, I use at the moment and since 3 months no medications anymore, but I told you also, that I have at home my little pharmacy for "just in case". Two days ago I slept not at all during the whole night. There was an emergency case from USA - a member from another topic. The dear lady was in panic, it seemed so during the chat. So I called her and she was thankful 12h later. Today I had a little panic-attack too. I have an urgent letter to write and also a document to prepare. In fact I would be able to do both things in the same time and so my body starts to feel a stress. My heart feels like a very hot big potato, my head is warm too and I can't concentrate me for just one subject. What have I done today to fix that?

A. I forgot to tell you. I smoked today during the long moments in Zurich for the first time again 2 cigarettes after 3 years interruption. Now the package Marlboro is a member of my private pharmacy, then it helps me to become calm when I'm in panic. What helps me in such moments too, is some water with gaz. When I stopped smoking in 1996, I drunk always some water, when I had the desire to eat something - mostly something sweety. After 3 weeks it was for me not anymore necessary to drink water. Today I can smoke a cigarette or more and stop instantly afterwards during years. Today I used the cigarettes as medication in moments of panic I had. Perhaps for some of you it is a piece of chocolate, or an apple or some vinagre. You must check it out and learn what your body likes, how it reacts or what helps your behaviour and condition to go forward.

Your topic-manager

Q. I need help with a delicate topic. My neice was diagnoised with Cranial Transannular Where he forehead was once as normal, now it has a forming point in the center to make it look as though her skull is shrinking inward. Please anyone help with any information you may have

A. your question troubled me... from what i know of bone development - what you say can very much happen but i never heard of a case like that.and i looked a bit about maybe some information about it, but i'm pretty sure that the name you gave is not the disease that she has, it's just a description. Cranial means skull, Trans means cross over and Annular means ring. but if you'll find the right name, or if it is really the real name, here is a bit of places you might find information-

http://www.merck.com/mmhe/sec05.html

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/bonediseases.html

Q. My son has atopic dermatitis that is treated with topical cream. Is he in a greater risk for other diseases? My 1 year old son has atopic dermatitis. We treat him with topical cream and he is getting better. What kind of a diseases is this? Is he in a greater risk for other diseases because of his skin lesions?

A. Atopic dermatitis is an immunological disease. As a guy that has many allergies I can say that i believe the best treatment is not topical cream. You need to find what causes the allergy and to exclude it from your life. This way you prevent the disease not just treat its symptoms.

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