Adjective Check List

Adjective Check List

A psychometric instrument used to assess a person’s psychological traits, based on a checklist of 300 adjectives and adjectival phrases from absent-minded to zany, and much in between, including active, cautious, determined, enthusiastic, intelligent, quiet, and so on. The test subject chooses those terms that he or she feels best describe himself/herself to others. The ACL is graded into 15 scales which reflect the person’s needs and wants and 9 scales for attributes, potentials, and roles.
References in periodicals archive ?
A self administered adjective check list consisting of 39 adjectives for type A personality and 26 adjectives for type B personality was used17.
The tool for the study was 20 items of the Urdu version of Adjective Check List used by Haque (1982).
To go about this, we used the Sensation-Seeking Scale, composed of 12 adjectives selected from the original Multiple Affect Adjective Check List (MAACL-R) by Zuckerman and Lubin (1985).
Lastly the Adjective Check List (ACL; Gough & Heilbrun, 1965) was administered, in which participants were asked to describe the indicated leader using adjectives from the checklist.
A survey method was used for the study and the data were collected by Web Based Education Attitudes Scale and The Adjective Check List (ACL).
In the present study an adapted version of Adjective check list (Parveen, 1999), consisting of 128 items, originally developed by Gough and Heilbrun (1980) was used as an instrument to collect data from the respondents to evaluate their perception in terms of various psychic needs.
Fifty teachers and 150 students at Sindh University campus described self and each other on five functional ego states via Adjective Check List.
The personality assessors recorded their impressions of the assessees following each standard assessment procedure and then, following the three-day assessment programme, they independently recorded their overall formulations of the personalities of the assessees by means of character sketches, trait rankings, an Adjective Check List (ACL) (Gough & Heilbrun, 1983) and the California Q set (Block, 1978).
In this study, the dependent variables, Assertiveness and Frustration, were assessed through student self-appraisals reported on the Gough (1952) Adjective Check List (ACL), a personality instrument composed of three hundred adjectives.
At this time, students were also asked to complete the Adjective Check List (ACL; Gough & Heilbrun, 1983) by indicating which of 300 adjectives were descriptive of themselves.
The Personality Adjective Check List (PACL; Strack, 1987) is comprised of a 105-item adjective checklist that measures personality traits reflective of DSM-III-R classifications.
Mood was measured with an adaptation of the Mood Adjective Check List (MACL; Nowlis, 1970).