anhidrosis

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sweating

 [swet´ing]
the excretion of moisture through the pores of the skin; called also perspiration and diaphoresis.

an·hi·dro·sis

(an'hĭ-drō'sis), [MIM*206600]
Absence of sweat glands or absence of sweating, for example, resulting from use of anticholinergic drugs.
Synonym(s): adiaphoresis
[G. an- priv. + hidrōs, sweat]

anhidrosis

/an·hi·dro·sis/ (an″hĭ-dro´sis) absence or deficiency of sweating.

anhidrosis

[an′hidrō′sis, an′hī-]
Etymology: Gk, a + hidros, without sweat
an abnormal condition characterized by inadequate perspiration.

anhidrosis

Dermatology The lack of appropriate sweat production in response to thermal or pharmacologic stimulation, which may become a medical emergency with hyperthermia, heat exhaustion, heatstroke, and death; anhidrosis may affect the entire body or be segmental in distribution and is divided into structural–eg, anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, sweat gland necrosis, or functional defects, often related to autonomic or thermoregulatory control which involve the central or peripheral nervous systems

an·hi·dro·sis

, anidrosis (an'hī-drō'sis, -i-drō'sis)
Inability to tolerate heat; reduction or complete absence of sweating.
Synonym(s): adiaphoresis.
[G. an- priv. + hidrōs, sweat]

anhidrosis

Absence of sweating or inadequate secretion of sweat.

anhidrosis

absence of, or reduced, sweating characteristic of diabetic autonomic neuropathy leading to dry and inelastic skin texture and proneness to fissuring along lines of skin stress, e.g. heel perimeter, or the plantar border of the medial longitudinal arch in a foot pronates excessively during stance; also characteristic of old age, certain drug therapies, circulatory compromise, systemic disease (e.g. underactive thyroid) and dermatological conditions; treated by topical emollients and/or creams containing 10-25% urea (see Box 1)
Box 1: Treatment of anhidrosis
  • Gentle massage to stimulate skin blood flow

  • Daily application of an emollient or hydrating cream

  • Reduction of hyperkeratosis/parakeratosis (scalpel, sanding disc, topical keratolytic)

  • Associated fissuring: reduction of local hyperkeratosis; topical ichthammol 12% in collodion, ichthammol in glycerin ± overlying tension strapping

  • Associated fungal infection: see Table 1

Table 1: Treatment of fungal infections of skin and nails
Infection siteAgent
Antimycotic agent (for the treatment of dermatophytosis)
SkinTopical allylamine (e.g. 1% terbinafine cream for 7 days)
Topical imidazoles (e.g. 2% miconazole or 1% clotrimazole for 28 days)
Topical 0.25% amorolfine
Topical 1% econazole
Topical griseofulvin spray (400 μg puff daily for 14 days)
Topical 1% sulconazole
Topical tea tree (manuka) oil
Topical undecenoate (20% zinc undecenoate + 5% undecenoic acid)
Topical Whitfield's ointment (6% benzoic acid + 3% salicylic acid)
Other topicals include: weak iodine solution 2.5%; potassium permanganate paint 1%; salicylate acid cream or alcoholic solution 3-5%; benzoic acid (Whitfield's) ointment; sodium polymetaphosphate dusting powder
Systemic terbinafine (250 mg daily for 2 weeks)
Systemic itraconazole (100 mg daily for 15 days)
Systemic griseofulvin (500 mg daily )
NailTopical amorolfine 0.25% lacquer as an adjunct to systemic treatment
Topical borotannic acid complex acid; Phytex paint (1.46% salicylic acid + 4.89% tannic acid + 3.12% boric acid)
Topical 28% tioconazole lacquer
Topical undecenoate lacquer; Monphytol paint (5% methyl undecenoate + 0.7% propyl undecenoate + 3% salicylic acid + 25% methyl salicylate + 5% propyl salicylate + 3% chlorambucil)
Other topicals: strong iodine 10% solution
Systemic terbinafine (250 mg daily for 12-16 weeks)
Systemic itraconazole (400 mg for 1 week in a month, repeated overall 3 or 4 times)
Anticandidal agent (for the treatment of candidiasis)
SkinTopical antimycotic creams (1% clotrimazole; 1% econazole; 2% miconazole)
Topical nystatin (100 000 units ± 1% tolnaftate)
Antipityriasis versicolor agent (for the treatment of pityriasis versicolor)
SkinTopical 2% ketoconazole
Topical 2.5% selenium sulphide
Topical antimycotic agents (1% clotrimazole; 1% econazole; 2% miconazole; 1% sulconazole; 1% terbinafine)
Systemic fluconazole/itraconazole/ketoconazole/miconazole/voriconazole

an·hi·dro·sis

, anidrosis (an'hī-drō'sis, -i-drō'sis) [MIM*206600]
Absence of sweat glands or absence of sweating.
[G. an- priv. + hidrōs, sweat]

anhidrosis (an´hīdrō´sis),

n a severe deficiency in the production of sweat; may be associated with hypodontia or anodontia in ectodermal dysplasia.

anhidrosis

absence of sweating. In horses the disease is common in tropical climates and seriously interferes with the racing calendar. Affected animals show respiratory distress even at rest, absence of sweating at times when all of the others in the group are sweating heavily; they are quite unable to race. Disease is akin to anhidrotic asthenia of humans. Called also puff disease, dry coat syndrome.