adiaspiromycosis

(redirected from Adiaspirosis)

a·di·a·spi·ro·my·co·sis

(ā'dē-ă-spī'rō-mī-kō'sis),
A rare pulmonary mycosis of humans, rodents, and other animals that dig in soil or are aquatic, caused by the fungus Emmonsia parva var. crescens.

adiaspiromycosis

/adi·a·spi·ro·my·co·sis/ (ad″e-ah-spi″ro-mi-ko´sis) a pulmonary disease of many species of rodents and occasionally of humans, due to inhalation of spores of the fungi Emmonsia parva and E. crescens, and marked by huge spherules (adiaspores) in the lungs.

Adiaspiromycosis

A rare fungal infection which affects mammals, including rodents and humans, after inhalation of dust-borne microconidia of a fungus, Emmonsia parva var crescens, which causes most cases of adiaspiromycosis in Europe and is marked by the formation of large, thick-walled spherules (adiaspores) in lungs and mediastinal lymph nodes.
Clinical findings Dry cough, low-grade fever, fatigue, shortness of breath, pulmonary infiltrates, granulomatous dissemination. It may be an incidental finding during workup for other causes. The effects of infection—compromised lung function—depend on spore burden and immune competence: it is more severe in AIDS patients.  
DiffDx Coccidioides immitis, helminths, Rhinosporidium seeberi, starch granules.
Managment Itracozole.

adiaspiromycosis

a respiratory disease of humans and many animal species caused by the fungus Chrysosporium spp. and characterized by large, thick-walled spherules (adiaspores).