acute phase protein

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acute phase protein

plasma proteins associated with inflammation including C-reactive protein (CRP), mannose-binding protein, serum amyloid P component, α1-antitrypsin, fibrinogen, ceruloplasmin, and complement components C9 and factor B, the concentrations of which increase in response to interleukins 1, 6, and 11.

acute phase protein

Any of the plasma proteins whose concentration increases or decreases by at least 25% during inflammation. Acute-phase proteins include C-reactive protein, several complement and coagulation factors, transport proteins, amyloid, and antiprotease enzymes. They help mediate both positive and negative effects of acute and chronic inflammation, including chemotaxis, phagocytosis, protection against oxygen radicals, and tissue repair. In clinical medicine the erythrocyte sedimentation rate or serum C-reactive protein level sometimes is used as a marker of increased amounts of acute-phase proteins. Synonym: acute phase reactant See: inflammation
See also: protein
References in periodicals archive ?
Circular paths are often trod with respect to the analysis of small acute-phase proteins such as serum amyloid A, as is evident in its discovery as a putative therapeutic response marker in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (18,19).
Assay validation and diagnostic applications of major acute-phase protein testing in companion animals.
3,4) The globulin portion of the protein EPH measures the acute-phase proteins and humoral, or adaptive, response to disease.
As an acute-phase protein synthesized by the liver, SAA has been reported to be increased in infectious and arthritic diseases (30-32) and malignancies (33).
Serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), [3] the classic acute-phase protein, cover a remarkable dynamic range and may exceed 500 mg/L at the peak of the acute-phase response (1).
Shortly thereafter, Lofstrom (3) demonstrated the presence of the acute-phase response (APR) [3] in both acute and chronic inflammatory conditions; consequently, C-reactive protein (CRP) became recognized as a nonspecific acute-phase protein.
01) with the highest CRP values observed in May, our statistical models did not provide significant results in favor of seasonal variation for this acute-phase protein in the remaining populations.
In contrast to the classical acute-phase protein CRP, PCT is not increased after operative trauma (10).
Interleukin-6 and acute-phase protein concentrations in surgical intensive care unit patients: diagnostic signs in nosocomial infection.
This delay between the stimulus of injury and subsequent increases in the APR is in agreement with the hypothesis that mediators such as interleukins are obligatory intermediates for the acute-phase protein response in humans.
C-reactive protein is an acute-phase protein, which rises due to infection, tissue injury, or inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis, cardiovascular disease and peripheral vascular disease.