acrylic resin

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Related to Acrylic Resins: Polyester resins

a·cryl·ic res·in

a general term applied to a resinous material of the various esters of acrylic acid; used as a denture base material, for other dental restorations, and for trays.

resin

(rez'in) [L. resina, fr. Gr. rhetine, resin of the pine]
1. A natural, amorphous, nonvolatile, soft or solid exudation of plants. It is practically insoluble in water but dissolves in alcohol. See: rosin
2. Any of a class of solid or soft organic compounds of natural or synthetic origin. They are usually of high molecular weight and most are polymers. Included are polyvinyl, polyethylene, and polystyrene. These are combined with chemicals such as epoxides, plasticizers, pigments, fillers, and stabilizers to form plastics.

acrylic resin

Quick-cure resin.

anion-exchange resin

See: ion-exchange resin

cation-exchange resin

See: ion-exchange resin

cholestyramine resin

An ion-exchange resin used to treat itching associated with jaundice and elevated serum lipid levels. Side effects may include bloating and abdominal discomfort.

cold-cure resin

Quick-cure resin.

ion-exchange resin

An ionizable synthetic substance, which may be acid or basic, used accordingly to remove either acid or basic ions from solutions. Anion-exchange resins are used to absorb acid in the stomach, and cation-exchange resins are used to remove basic (alkaline) ions from solutions.

quick-cure resin

An autopolymer resin, used in many dental procedures, that can be polymerized by an activator and catalyst without applying external heat.
Synonym: acrylic resin; cold-cure resin; self-curing resin

self-curing resin

Quick-cure resin.

a·cryl·ic res·in

(ă-krilik rezin)
Resinous material of various esters of acrylic acid; used as a denture base material, dental restorations, and trays.
References in periodicals archive ?
Underlying all of this activity is the recognition that new chemistries and technologies are fundamental to the continued use of acrylic resins in coatings applications.
Resins offered: acrylic resins, acrylic-styrene emulsions, alkyd resins, crosslinking resins, emulsions, high-solid resins, hybrid resins, polyester resins, styrene resins, urethane/polyurethane resins
Market Analytics III-56 Table 78: German Recent Past, Current & Future Analysis for Acrylic Resins by Product Segment - Acrylates and Methacrylates Markets Independently Analyzed with Annual Consumption Figures in Thousand Pounds for Years 2012 through 2020 (includes corresponding Graph/Chart) III-56
Table 4: World Historic Review for Acrylic Resins by
Acrylic Resins, Alkyd Resins, Cellulose Derivatives, Epoxy Hardeners-Chemicals, Epoxy Resins, Ester Gums, High-Solid Resins, Hybrid Resins, Hydrocarbon Resins, Maleic Resins, Melamine & Melamine Type Resins, Misc.
Many techniques such as the direct method, indirect method or relining and injection of coldcure acrylic resin to fabricate provisional restorations have been used for achieving good marginal adaptation of the provisional restoration [6,7].
The liquid of heat cured acrylic resins contain monomer (methyl metacrylate), inhibitors, plasticizers and hardening agents.
Ben Price, director of purchasing at Wikoff Color, said that the raw materials of most concern to the company are the monomers and oligomers used in its energy cure products, along with the acrylic resins used in its waterbased products.
Six epoxy resins designed as R1-R6 (Shell and Chemical Company Organika-Sarzyna Poland)--obtained by a polycondensation reaction of bisphenol and epichlorohydrin--and six acrylic resins designed as A1-A6 (DSM Neoresins Plus, Evonik Degussa and Rohm and Haas) were chosen for the purpose of our work.
Pour acrylic resin into the crown, seat it and have the patient bite into the centric occlusion.
Surface Specialties already operates a resins plant at the 150,000 square meter site, where it produces powder and acrylic resins for coatings and unsaturated polyester resins for a variety of uses.
ACCORDING to the British Medical Journal, nail sculpture, which involves using resins to improve the cosmetic appearance of fingernails, gives off fumes that can cause wheezing and a tight chest, particularly in those manicurists who habitually use acrylic resins.