Acinetobacter

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Related to Acinetobacter infections: Acinetobacter baumannii

Acinetobacter

(as-i-ne'tō-bak'ter),
A genus of nonmotile, aerobic bacteria (family Moraxellaceae) containing gram-negative or -variable coccoid or short rods, or cocci, often occurring in pairs. Spores are not produced. These bacteria grow on ordinary media without the addition of serum. They are oxidase negative and catalase positive; carbohydrates are oxidized or not attacked at all, and arginine dihydrolase is not produced. They are a frequent cause of nosocomial infections; often resistant to many antibiotics, they can also cause severe primary infections in immunocompromised people. The type species is Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.
Synonym(s): Lingelsheimia

Acinetobacter

/Ac·i·net·o·bac·ter/ (as″ĭ-ne″to-bak´ter) a genus of bacteria (family Neisseriaceae), consisting of aerobic, gram-negative, paired coccobacilli, it is widely distributed in nature and part of the normal mammalian flora, but can cause severe primary infections in compromised hosts. The type species, A. calcoaceticus, can cause fatal pneumonia.

Acinetobacter

(ă′sə-nē′tō-băk′tər, -nĕt′ō-, -nē′tō-băk′-, nĕt′ō-)
n.
A genus of aerobic, gram-negative bacteria occurring primarily in soil and water, including many pathogenic species.

Acinetobacter

[as′inē′təbak′tər]
a genus of nonmotile, aerobic bacteria of the family Neisseriaceae that often occurs in clinical specimens. The bacterium contains gram-negative or gram-variable cocci and does not produce spores. It grows on regular medium without serum and is oxidase negative and catalase positive. It is mainly found in water, and its disease activity is opportunistic. Most human disease is caused by A. baumannii. The bacterium can cause various infections, including pneumonia, wound infections, bacteremia, and meningitis. Most infections occur in immunocompromised individuals and rarely occur outside of intensive care units and other health care settings. The organism can also colonize patients without causing symptoms or infection, particularly in open wounds or tracheostomy sites. Acinetobacter is often resistant to those antibiotics used regularly.
enlarge picture
Gram stain of Acinetobacter baumannii

Acinetobacter

A widely distributed genus of bacteria found in moist hospital environments, which may establish itself in the respiratory flora and on the skin of patients after prolonged hospitalisation, often via contaminated medical instruments—e.g., catheters and IV lines, which introduce Acinetobacter to normally sterile sites. Infections are generally nosocomial, occur in warmer seasons and involve the genitourinary and respiratory tracts, wounds, and soft tissues.

Ac·i·ne·to·bac·ter

(as-i-nē'tō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of nonmotile, aerobic bacteria (family Moraxellaceae), frequently a cause of nosocomial infections; often resistant to antibiotics, can also cause severe primary infections in immunocompromised patients.
Synonym(s): Lingelsheimia.

Ac·i·ne·to·bac·ter

(as-i-nē'tō-bak'tĕr)
A genus of nonmotile, non-spore-forming aerobic bacteria containing gram-negative or -variable coccoid or short rods, or cocci, often occurring in pairs; a frequent cause of nosocomial infections; often resistant to many antibiotics, can also cause severe primary infections in immunocompromised people.

Acinetobacter

gram-negative bacteria commonly found in the environment and often normal flora in animals and humans, but has been associated with nosocomial infections and with bronchopneumonia in mink.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to studies, acinetobacter infections are not uncommon in preterm ICUs and there are reports of infant deaths in other countries.
Currently, the antimicrobials that can be utilized in some cases of Acinetobacter infection are sulbactam, carbapenems, aminoglycosides, tigecycline, and polymixin-based compounds (1, 4-6).
We found few Acinetobacter infections at the VAPAHCS, which may reflect the changing epidemiology of Acinetobacter infections in OIF/OEF veterans or successful treatment of Acinetobacter infection closer to the time of acquisition in Afghanistan or Iraq.
Less than 1% of the Acinetobacter infections came from hospitals with fewer than 200 beds, while 55% came from hospitals with more than 500 beds.
Mortality can be high for patients with Acinetobacter infections.
Antibiotic treatment of Acinetobacter infections should be based on the particular sensitivities of individual isolates, because the organism has developed resistance to multiple drugs, including members of the penicillin, aminoglycoside, fluoroquinolone, and cephalosporin families.
James' intensive care unit have kept the ionizers in operation since the clinical trial ended and continue to report fewer acinetobacter infections on the ward.
It also reviews key players involved in the therapeutic development for Acinetobacter Infections.
aeruginosa and MDR Acinetobacter infections, respectively, for which few treatment options remain available.
However, very limited clinical data are available to draw conclusion on the utility of tigecycline in treatment of MDR Acinetobacter infections.
Acinetobacter infections frequently occur in severely ill ICU patients with other chronic illnesses or prolonged hospitalizations.
Mortality can be high for patients who have Acinetobacter infections.