hydrolysis

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hydrolysis

 [hi-drol´ĭsis] (pl. hydrol´yses)
the cleavage of a compound by the addition of water, the hydroxyl group being incorporated in one fragment and the hydrogen atom in the other. adj., adj hydrolyt´ic.

hy·drol·y·sis

(hī-drol'i-sis),
A chemical process whereby a compound is cleaved into two or more simpler compounds with the uptake of the H and OH parts of a water molecule on either side of the chemical bond cleaved; hydrolysis is effected by the action of acids, alkalies, or enzymes. Compare: hydration.
Synonym(s): hydrolytic cleavage
[hydro- + G. lysis, dissolution]

hydrolysis

/hy·drol·y·sis/ (hi-drol´ĭ-sis) pl. hydrol´yses   the cleavage of a compound by the addition of water, the hydroxyl group being incorporated in one fragment and the hydrogen atom in the other.hydrolyt´ic

hydrolysis

[hīdrol′isis]
Etymology: Gk, hydor + lysis, loosening
the chemical alteration or decomposition of a compound with water.

hy·drol·y·sis

(hī-drol'i-sis)
A chemical process whereby a compound is cleaved into two or more simpler compounds with the uptake of the H and OH parts of a water molecule on either side of the chemical bond cleaved; hydrolysis is effected by the action of acids, alkalies, or enzymes.
Compare: hydration
[hydro- + G. lysis, dissolution]

hydrolysis

Splitting of a compound into two parts by the addition of water (H2O), the hydrogen atom (H) joining to one part and the hydroxyl group (OH) joining to the other. Hydrolysis is usually effected by a hydrolytic ENZYME.

hydrolysis

a chemical reaction in which large molecules are broken down by the addition of water. For example, fat to fatty acids and glycerol, MALTOSE to glucose, DIPEPTIDE to two amino acids. The reactions are usually enzymically activated. Compare CONDENSATION REACTION.

hydrolysis

chemical cleavage of a compound (by acid, alkali or enzymic action) into simpler compounds

hydrolysis (hī·drˑ·l·sis),

n a chemical reaction in which a substance reacts with water.

hy·drol·y·sis

(hī-drol'i-sis)
1. Process by which water slowly penetrates suture filaments and breaks down the suture's polymer chain; hydroxylation produces less tissue reaction.
2. Chemical process in which compound is cloven into two or more simpler compounds; effected by action of acids, alkalis, or enzymes.
[hydro- + G. lysis, dissolution]

hydrolysis (hīdrol´isis),

n 1. a reaction between the ions of salt and those of water to form an acid and a base, one or both of which is only slightly dissociated. A process whereby a large molecule is split by the addition of water. The end products divide the water, the hydroxyl group being attached to one and the hydrogen ion to the other.
n 2. the splitting of a compound into two parts with the addition of the elements of water.

hydrolysis

the cleavage of a compound by the addition of water, the hydroxyl group being incorporated in one fragment and the hydrogen atom in the other.
References in periodicals archive ?
Acid hydrolysis of secoiridoid aglycons during storage of virgin olive oil.
The yield of hydroxytyrosol from the acid hydrolysis of OLG was essentially quantitative (Fig.
The total morphine concentration was determined as described for free morphine after acid hydrolysis according to the method of Maurer and co-workers (27, 28).
Chromatographic behavior of the compounds was investigated before and after perchloric acid hydrolysis.
In addition, the market is segmented on the basis of manufacturing technology, such as nanocellulose produced by acid hydrolysis, high-pressure homogenization or Brown's mass manufacturing method.
Hydrolysis can be performed in two ways: acid hydrolysis or enzymatic hydrolysis.
Although acid hydrolysis is more common process, it produces dangerous acid wastes and has technical difficulties in recovering sugars from the acid (Sukumaran et al.
Briefly, this method involves the acid hydrolysis of an extract of the sample, quantification of quercetin, kaempferol and isorhamnetin by HPLC against reference standards, and calculation of the quantity (in mg) of each flavonol glycoside in the sample using the formula:
The extraction of crystalline cellulosic regions, in the form of nanowhiskers, can be accomplished by a simple process based on acid hydrolysis.
This study utilizing dilute acid hydrolysis required longer hydrolysis or retention time to produce or release higher carbohydrates.
It was hypothesized that by using both alkaline hydrolysis and acid hydrolysis that nine different kinds of waste biomass samples can be converted into glucose through the hydrolysis processes.