Achilles tendon

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Related to Achilles tendons: Achilles tendinitis

Achilles tendon

 [ah-kil´ēz]
the strong tendon at the back of the heel that connects the calf muscles (triceps surae muscle) to the heel bone. The name is derived from the legend of the Greek hero Achilles, who was vulnerable only in one heel. Tapping this tendon normally produces the reflex called the Achilles or ankle jerk. Failure or exaggeration of this reflex indicates disease or injury to the nerves of the leg muscles or of a part of the spinal cord.

cal·ca·ne·al ten·don

[TA]
the thick tendon of insertion of the triceps surae (gastrocnemius and soleus) into the tuberosity of the calcaneus.

Achilles tendon

n.
The large tendon connecting the heel bone to the calf muscles of the leg.

Achilles tendon

[əkil′ēz]
Etymology: Achilles, Greek mythological hero
the common distal tendon of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of the leg. It is the thickest and strongest tendon in the body and connects the triceps surae to the heel bone. In an adult, it is about 15 cm long. The tendon becomes contracted about 4 cm above the heel and flares out again to insert into the calcaneus. Also called tendo calcaneus.
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Achilles tendon

Achilles tendon

The long common tendon of both venters of the calf muscles (gastrocnemius and soleus), which attaches them to the calcaneus bone; it is the strongest tendon in the body. The AT begins below the posterior calf and is attached distally at the midline at the posterior aspect of the calcaneus.
 
Conditions affecting Achilles tendon
Insertional tendinitis, rupture.

Achilles tendon

tendo calcaneo Anatomy The tendon that attaches the calf muscles to the calcaneous bone; the long common tendon of both venters–bellies of the calf muscles—gastrocnemius and soleus, which is the strongest tendon in the body; the AT begins below the posterior calf and is attached distally at the midline at the posterior aspect of the calcaneus Conditions affecting Insertional tendinitis, rupture

ten·do cal·ca·ne·us

(ten'dō kal-kā'nē-ŭs) [TA]
The tendon of insertion of the triceps surae (gastrocnemius and soleus) into the tuberosity of the calcaneus.
Synonym(s): Achilles tendon, heel tendon.

Achilles tendon

The prominent tendon just above the heel by means of which the powerful muscles of the calf are attached to the large heel bone. Contraction of the prominent calf muscles pulls the Achilles tendon upwards so that the ankle is straightened and the heel leaves the ground. The Achilles tendon is essential in walking and running and is easily strained or torn. (Named after Achilles, son of Peleus and Thetis, who, as a baby, was said to have been held by his heel and dipped in the river Styx by his mother to make him invulnerable. He died from a heel wound).

Achilles,

mythical Greek warrior who was vulnerable only in the heel.
Achilles bursa - bursa between the tendo calcaneus and the upper part of the posterior surface of the calcaneum. Synonym(s): bursa of tendo calcaneus
Achilles reflex - a contraction of the calf muscles when the tendo calcaneus is sharply struck. Synonym(s): ankle jerk; ankle reflex; tendo Achillis reflex; triceps surae reflex
Achilles tendon - the tendon of insertion of the triceps surae (gastrocnemius and soleus) into the tuberosity of the calcaneus. Synonym(s): tendo calcaneus
Figure 1: The autonomic nervous system. Actions on the heart and on smooth muscle. Sympathetic actions on the left and parasympathetic actions on the right. Solid arrows: stimulation (contraction or secretion); broken arrows: inhibition.

Achilles tendon

a large tendon ( aka tendo calcaneus ) at the back of the ankle, joining the main calf muscles (gastrocnemius and soleus) to the heel bone (calcaneum). The tendon is commonly injured in sport either by direct trauma (resulting in partial or complete rupture) or by repeated micro-trauma or overuse resulting in inflammation. Achilles tendonitis is most commonly the result of poor technique, poor footwear, hard running surface, high-intensity or long-distance running. Treatment is with RICE, anti-inflammatory medication, a heel raise and correction of causes. Surgery may be required in severe cases. Achilles bursitis is inflammation of the bursa (a 'bag' of fluid) that separates the tendon from the back of the calcaneum. Figure 1.

Achilles tendon

; tendo Achilles; TA large posterior lower-leg tendon arising from the inferior margins of superior posterior muscle group and inserting into the middle one-third of the posterior aspect of the calcaneum; superficial fibres extend distally into the plantar heel area to blend with superficial plantar fascia fibres; TA dysfunction is associated with poor rearfoot function and posterior/plantar heel pain

Achilles tendon

the group of tendons that insert on the calcaneus near the point of the hock made up of the tendons of the gastrocnemius, soleus, superficial digital flexor, semitendinosus and biceps femoris muscles. Called also common calcaneal tendon. See also gastrocnemius muscle tendon.
References in periodicals archive ?
To find out how quickly the Achilles tendon can regenerate, the research group used a somewhat unusual combination of competences - and adopted a positive approach to the many nuclear tests carried out during the Cold War.
The use of xenogenic small intestinal sub mucosa as biomaterials for Achilles tendon repair in a dog model.
Evaluation porcine small intestinal sub mucosa in Achilles tendon repair.
Increased content of type III collagen at the rupture site of human Achilles tendon.
Functional bracing for rupture of the Achilles tendon.
Influence of burst TENS stimulation on the healing of Achilles tendon suture in man.
We report a 33-year-old female who sustained bilateral ruptures of the Achilles tendon approximately 48 hours apart with no obvious predisposing factors.
A complete rupture of the right Achilles tendon was diagnosed.
She was unable to bear weight, and had to be carried by her husband to the fracture clinic where examination revealed a palpable defect in the left Achilles tendon 3 cm proximal to its insertion on the calcaneum.
The histological picture was compatible with the degenerative features typical of acute Achilles tendon rupture.
The Achilles tendon is the largest and strongest human tendon, resulting from the joining of the tendons of the two heads of gastrocnemius and soleus.
In fact, the results showed that the Achilles tendon stays the same after growing ends.