Achard-Thiers syndrome


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A·chard-Thiers syn·drome

(ah-shar te-ā'),
obsolete term for a form of a virilizing disorder of adrenocortical origin in women, characterized by masculinization and menstrual disorders in association with manifestations of diabetes mellitus, such as glucosuria.

Achard-Thiers syndrome

[äsh′är tērz′]
Etymology: Emile C. Achard, French physician, 1860-1941; Joseph Thiers, French physician, b. 1885
a hormonal disorder seen in postmenopausal women with diabetes mellitus, characterized by the growth of body hair in a masculine distribution. Treatment includes mechanical removal or bleaching of excess hair and hormonal therapy to correct endocrine imbalances related to systemic disease. See also hirsutism.

Achard-Thiers syndrome

An idiopathic condition affecting post-menopausal women which is characterised by type-2 diabetes and masculinisation with hirsutism, clitoral hypertrophy and deepening of the voice due to overproduction of androgens, which is often accompanied by amenorrhoea, obesity, hypertension, adrenal adenoma, osteoporosis.

Achard-Thiers syndrome

Endocrinology A condition affecting post-menopausal ♀ characterized by DM, hirsutism and masculinization, which is caused by overproduction of androgens

Achard,

Émile Charles, French physician, 1860-1941.
Achard syndrome - arachnodactyly with small, receding mandible, broad skull, and joint laxity limited to the hands and feet.
Achard-Thiers syndrome - one form of a virilizing disorder of adrenocortical origin in women.

Thiers,

Joseph, French physician, 1885–.
Achard-Thiers syndrome - see under Achard