Accuzyme

Accuzyme™

Molecular biology A thermostable enzyme possessing 5 -3  DNA polymerase and 3 -5  high-fidelity proof-reading exonuclease activities, producing blunt-ended amplicons of up to 5Kb in length, optimised for use in a detergent-free system.
Wound care A topical ointment containing urea and papain, which is FDA approved for debriding wounds.

Accuzyme

Wound care An enzymatic ointment for debriding acute and chronic wounds. See Wound care.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prior authorization for ACCUZYME and PANAFIL is not required.
ACCUZYME Ointment, Papain, Urea, 30 gram tube (NDC# 00064-1000-01) and PANAFIL Ointment, Papain, Urea, Chlorophyllin Copper Complex Sodium, 30 gram tube (NDC# 00064-3410-30) are readily available at pharmacies and drug wholesalers in California and nationwide.
Ulcer-related treatment history included sharp debridement, accuzyme (enzymatic debrider) and KCI wound vacuum device.
Accuzyme is an enzymatic debriding ointment used to treat wounds, pressure ulcers and burns by removing dead tissue without harming living tissue.
ACCUZYME SE and PANAFIL SE are the first wound care treatments to receive this commendation from the Arthritis Foundation.
Conversely, ACCUZYME is marketed solely as an enzymatic debriding agent for necrotic wounds.
has announced that ACCUZYME(R) (Papain, Urea) Ointment, its popular pharmaceutical product for wound debriding, is now available in a new pump-spray delivery system, ACCUZYME Spray, on which a patent application is pending.
When the company contacted the New York State Department of Health to interpret the program with relation to their two brands Accuzyme and Panafil, an official stated that the program would not affect either product based on the criteria that New York State is using.
In the lawsuit, HEALTHPOINT alleged that Ethex Corporation marketed Ethezyme as a "generic" and as an "alternative" to its prescription ointment ACCUZYME(R) and as having the "same active ingredients, in the same quantities" as ACCUZYME when Ethex knew those statements to be false.
In the lawsuit, HEALTHPOINT alleged that Ethex Corporation marketed Ethezyme as a "generic" and as an "alternative" to ACCUZYME(R) and as having the "same active ingredients, in the same quantities" as ACCUZYME when Ethex knew those statements to be false.
In particular, the Court determined that it is likely that HEALTHPOINT will succeed in showing that Stratus' use of terms and phrases like "generic," "generic alternative," "branded generic," "bioequivalent," or "equivalent" improperly suggest that Kovia is interchangeable with Accuzyme and Ziox is interchangeable with Panafil since there has been no determination of these products' equivalence.