tenure

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tenure

[ten′yər]
Etymology: L, tenere, to hold
1 (in a university) a faculty appointment with few limits on the number of years it may be held.
2 a permanent appointment usually awarded to a person who has advanced to the rank of associate professor and who demonstrates scholarship, community service, and teaching excellence in a specific field of study.

tenure

Academia A status granted to a person with a 'terminal' degree–eg, doctor of medicine–MD or doctor of philosophy–PhD, after a trial period, which protects him/her from summary dismissal; tenured academicians are expected to assume major duties in research, teaching and, if applicable, Pt care fostering, through their activities, the academic 'agenda' of their respective departments or institutions. See Endowed chair, Lecturer, Professor. Cf Chair.

tenure

(tĕn′yĕr) [L. tenēre, to hold]
1. The holding of a property, place, or occupational assignment.
2. The specification that an employee (typically someone in an academic setting) may hold a position permanently unless he or she behaves with gross negligence.
References in periodicals archive ?
General report of the committee on academic freedom and academic tenure.
When viewed in this light, academic tenure, while long-recognized and accepted, is actually a fairly radical idea: it results in a status that is not available to the vast majority of other American workers.
The lay literature (a description charitably extended to include newspapers), governmental hearing records, and criminal courts are replete with examples for the dedicated researcher to examine, to digest (however unappetizing the fare may be), and to develop preliminary hypotheses, later to become theories and, eventually, peer-reviewed publications, all leading to academic tenure, fame, promotion, invited-speaker circuits, and well-padded curricula vitae.
Factors that affect academic tenure in schools of nursing.
In this article we explore the incentive properties of academic tenure relative to alternatives that might be substitutes for tenure.
Issues of academic tenure and contractual matters are as real as their counterparts in policing.
Academic tenure differs from the job protection seniority provides to productions workers.
In this article the reform of academic tenure is examined in the United Kingdom.

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