abstraction

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abstraction

 [ab-strak´shun]
1. the mental process of forming ideas that are theoretical or representational rather than concrete.
2. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
3. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is farther from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face.

ab·strac·tion

(ab-strak'shŭn),
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
See also: odontoptosis.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
See also: odontoptosis.
3. The making of an abstract from the crude drug.
See also: odontoptosis.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
See also: odontoptosis.
5. The processes or the results of discernment of formulation of general concepts from specific examples, and/or ascertainment of a given aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstraction

/ab·strac·tion/ (ab-strak´shun)
1. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
2. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is further from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face; cf. attraction (2).

abstraction

[abstrak′shən]
Etymology: L, abstrahere, to drag away
a condition in which teeth or other maxillary and mandibular structures are inferior to their normal position, away from the occlusal plane. Also called infraclusion, or infraocclusion.

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
3. The making of an abstract from a crude drug.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
5. The process of selecting a certain aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstraction (abstrak´shən),

n teeth or other maxillary and mandibular structures that are inferior to (below) their normal position; away from the occlusal plane.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abstract concepts can be represented in the brain only by verbal coding, whereas concrete concepts can be represented in the brain by both verbal coding and image coding.
1987; Lee & Boling, 1999; Levie & Lentz, 1982), the methods by which these graphics are chosen for abstract concepts and the resulting learner perceptions of those graphics is less well documented.
Thus, while concrete concepts seem to rely strongly on sensorimotor properties, abstract concepts rely more on affective associations, but both concrete and abstract words rely on linguistic properties (see Kousta, Vigliocco, Vinson, Andrews, & del Campo, 2011).
As young people move into subject areas like advanced mathematics and chemistry that rely on highly abstract concepts, computers have much to offer.
Further, the impressionistic lyrics for tunes like the propulsive "First Wave Intact" and infectious "Light's On" are inspired more by abstract concepts than strict narratives.
Jellyby, we are ready with passionate concern and time to give on behalf of abstract concepts or groups of persons we don't know because it is easier to care about what is not immediately at hand than about the people at our doorsteps.
Twilight" used a range of elements--photographs, a laser installation, a rotating stained-glass window, and place-names painted on the walls--to imagine and interpret abstract concepts like time, space, and light.
Because of this approach, Humanists tend to reject failed doctrines, simplistic or uselessly abstract concepts of right and wrong, and stereotyped or conspiratorial notions of good and evil.
Skills in lateral thought, abstract concepts, social mores, verbal and non-verbal communications, along with sensitivity and a tolerance of bizarre or shocking behavior, are essential.
This expectation arises because of a failure to appreciate that definitions apply only to abstract concepts, such as the notion of species taken as a class.
If, as historian Nancy Shoemaker remarks, the use of body metaphors to explain abstract concepts is "probably a universal cognitive practice, no matter the culture," then it is quite remarkable that so few scholars engaged in early American studies have chosen to analyze them until now.