absorption

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absorption

 [ab-sorp´shun]
1. the act of taking up or in by specific chemical or molecular action; especially the passage of liquids or other substances through a surface of the body into body fluids and tissues, as in the absorption of the end products of digestion into the villi that line the intestine.
2. in psychology, devotion of thought to one object or activity only.
3. in radiology, uptake of energy by matter with which the radiation interacts. It can vary with the mass (density) subjected to x-radiation and the penetrability of the x-rays. A thin lead plate might absorb 100 per cent of an x-ray beam, while several centimeters of tissue might attenuate it only slightly, even at low voltages.
4. in chemistry, the penetration of a substance within the inner structure of another; see also adsorption.
chemical absorption any process by which one substance in liquid or solid form penetrates the surface of another substance.
digestive absorption the passage of the end products of digestion from the gastrointestinal tract into the blood and lymphatic vessels and the cells of tissues. Absorption of this kind can take place either by diffusion or by active transport.
radiation absorption the dissipation of radiant energy as it passes through matter. This phenomenon is of particular importance in diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, which depends on the interaction between ionizing radiations and matter. As radiation passes through matter, it is absorbed by an amount dependent on the atomic and molecular structure and thickness of the substance, and the energy of the primary photons. If radiations pass through a medium of living or nonliving material without absorption (loss of energy), no biologic or photographic effects can occur. In true absorption the photons of radiation waves give up or transfer all of their energy to electrons within the atoms of the matter through which they are passing.

ab·sorp·tion

(ab-sōrp'shŭn), Do not confuse this word with adsorption.
1. The taking in, incorporation, or reception of gases, liquids, light, or heat. Compare: adsorption.
2. In radiology, the uptake of energy from radiation by the tissue or medium through which it passes.
3. Removal of a particular antibody from a mixture on addition of the complementary antigen.
[L. absorptio, fr. absorbeo, to swallow]

absorption

/ab·sorp·tion/ (-sorp´shun)
1. the uptake of substances into or across tissues.
2. in psychology, devotion of thought to one object or activity only.
3. uptake of energy by matter with which the radiation interacts.
4. in chemistry, the penetration of a substance within the inner structure of another.

intestinal absorption  the uptake from the intestinal lumen of fluids, solutes, proteins, fats, and other nutrients into the intestinal epithelial cells, blood, lymph, or interstitial fluids.

absorption

[absôrp′shən]
Etymology: L, absorptio
1 the incorporation of matter by other matter through chemical, molecular, or physical action, such as the dissolution of a gas in a liquid or the taking up of a liquid by a porous solid.
2 (in physiology) the passage of substances across and into tissues, such as the passage of digested food molecules into intestinal cells or the passage of liquids into kidney tubules. Types of absorption are agglutinin absorption,cutaneous absorption,external absorption,intestinal absorption, parenteral absorption, and pathological absorption.
3 (in radiology) the process of absorbing electromagnetic radiation in which a photon of energy is taken up by living or nonliving matter. absorb, v.

absorption

The process of taking in.
 
Chemistry
The drawing of a gas or liquid into the pores of a permeable solid.
 
EBM
The process by which medications reach the blood stream when administered other than intravenously, for example through nasal membranes.

Histology
The impregnation of a tissue by a dye, to be subsequently examined by light microscopy.
 
Immunology
A lab technique consisting of either removal of an antibody from serum by adding its cognate antigen, or removal of an antigen by adding its cognate antibody; absorption allows an antiserum to be purified by removing unwanted immunoglobulins, or may be used to seek out an antigen or antibody of interest.
 
Pharmacology
The process by which a drug enters the body and is available for therapeutic activity; uptake of material across a surface—e.g., epidermis, GI mucosa, renal tubules. 

Routes of administration
Oral, IV, rectal, intramuscular, subcutaneous, inhalation, transdermal; agents administered extravascularly are absorbed by passive diffusion of the non-ionised drug fraction.

Physics
The uptake of electromagnetic energy by a medium as a result of electromagnetic waves or particles passing through it.

Physiology
The passage of food, water and nutrients across the gastrointestinal mucosa (beginning at the distal duodenum) during digestion; the movement and uptake of substances (liquids and solutes) into cells or across “barriers” (e.g., skin, GI mucosa, renal tubules, blood vessels) by diffusion or osmosis.

Psychology
Complete focusing of attention on one object or activity.
 
Social medicine
The assimilation of a person’s cultural identity by another.

Absorption

The process of taking in.
Chemistry The drawing of a gas or liquid into the pores of a permeable solid.
Histology Direct staining The impregnation of a tissue by a dye, to be subsequently examined by light microscopy.
Immunology Agglutinin absorption A lab technique consisting of either removal of an antibody from serum by adding its cognate antigen, or removal of an antigen by adding its cognate antibody; absorption allows an antiserum to be purified by removing unwanted immunoglobulins, or may be used to “fish” for an antigen or antibody of interest.
Pharmacology The process by which a drug enters the body and is available for therapeutic activity; uptake of material across a surface—e.g., epidermis, GI mucosa, renal tubules. 
Routes of administration Oral, IV, rectal, intramuscular, subcutaneous, inhalation, transdermal; agents administered extravascularly are absorbed by passive diffusion of the nonionised drug fraction.
Physics The uptake of electromagnetic energy by a medium as a result of electromagnetic waves or particles passing through it.
Physiology The passage of food, water and nutrients across the gastrointestinal mucosa—beginning at the distal duodenum—during digestion. The movement and uptake of substances—liquids and solutes—into cells or across “barriers”, e.g. skin, GI mucosa, renal tubules, blood vessels—by diffusion or osmosis.
Psychology Complete focusing of attention on one object or activity.
Social medicine The assimilation of a person’s cultural identity by another.

absorption

The process of taking in Immunology Agglutinin absorption A lab technique consisting of either removal of an antibody from serum by adding its cognate antigen, or removal of an antigen by adding its cognate antibody; absorption allows an antiserum to be purified by removing unwanted immunoglobulins, or may be used to 'fish' for an antigen or antibody of interest Medtalk The uptake of material across a surface–eg, epidermis, GI mucosa, renal tubules Pharmacology The process by which a drug enters the body and is available for therapeutic activity; agents administered IV are absorbed completely; agents administered extravascularly are usually absorbed by passive diffusion of the nonionized drug fraction; a drug's concentration in the blood is a function of the ratio of absorption to elimination. See Accumulation.

ab·sorp·tion

(ăb-sōrp'shŭn)
1. The taking in, incorporation, or reception of gases, liquids, light, or heat.
Compare: adsorption
2. radiology The uptake of energy from radiation by the tissue or medium through which it passes.
3. medical physics The number of disintegrations per second of a radionuclide.
4. radioactivity Unit (SI): becquerel.
5. nutrition Uptake of nutrients and nonnutrients by cells in the gastrointestinal tract.
6. The process by which a compound penetrates an epithelial barrier such as the skin, eyes, respiratory tract, or gastrointestinal tract to reach the interior of the body.
See also: absorbed dose, internal dose
[L. absorptio, fr. absorbeo, to swallow]

absorption

1. The movement of liquids and of dissolved substances across a membrane, from one compartment of the body to another or into the blood.
2. The assimilation of digested food material into the blood from the small intestine. Compare ADSORPTION. See also DIGESTION.

absorption

the process by which energy or matter passively or actively enters a system, e.g. the take up of nutrient material from the gut system of animals into the blood stream, or the process by which chlorophyll absorbs light for the process of photosynthesis. Compare ADSORPTION.

Absorption

The transfer of a vitamin from the digestive tract to the bloodstream.
Mentioned in: Vitamin Toxicity

intestinal absorption

the transfer of the products of digestion, minerals and water (also drugs) from the intestine into the blood or lymph. Food products are absorbed from the small intestine, via its lining of enterocytes (where some further digestive processes take place); hexoses from carbohydrates, and amino acids and peptides from proteins, enter surrounding blood vessels, thence in the portal vein to the liver, which removes some before they reach the general circulation. Lipids enter lymph vessels and these 'lacteals' ('milky' with fat) join other lymph vessels to reach the thoracic duct, thence to the venous blood. Some water is absorbed from the small intestine, but most from the large intestine.

absorption 

Transformation of radiant energy into a different form of energy, usually heat, as it passes through a medium. Light that is absorbed is neither transmitted nor reflected. It may, however, be re-emitted as light of another wavelength as, for example, ultraviolet radiation is converted into visible radiation on absorption by a luminescent material. A substance that absorbs all radiations is called a black body. See absorbance; optical density; fluo-rescence.

ab·sorp·tion

(ab-sōrp'shŭn) Do not confuse this word with adsorption.
1. The taking in, incorporation, or reception of gases, liquids, light, or heat.
Compare: adsorption
2. In radiology, the uptake of energy from radiation by the tissue or medium through which it passes.
3. Removal of a particular antibody from a mixture on addition of the complementary antigen.
[L. absorptio, fr. absorbeo, to swallow]

absorption (abzôrp´shən),

n 1. the passage of a substance into the interior of another by solution or penetration.
n 2. the taking up of fluids or other substances by the skin, mucous surfaces, absorbent vessels, or dental materials so that they are removed.
n 3. the process by which radiation imparts some or all of its energy to any material through which it passes.
absorption coefficient,
n the ratio of the linear rate of change of intensity of roentgen rays in a given homogeneous material to the intensity at a given point within the same mass.
absorption, drug,
n in dentistry, the factors that determine the speed and duration of response to a local anesthetic. The faster the absorption, the higher the chance of systemic toxicity and the lower the duration of effectiveness. The rate is altered by route of administration, use of vasoconstrictors, and patient factors.

absorption

1. the act of taking up or in by specific chemical or molecular action; especially the passage of liquids or other substances through a surface of the body into body fluids and tissues, as in the absorption of the end products of digestion into the villi that line the intestine.
2. in radiology, uptake of energy by matter with which the radiation interacts.

chemical absorption
any process by which one substance in liquid or solid form penetrates the surface of another substance.
Compton absorption effect
differential absorption
the difference in the absorption of x-rays by different tissues.
digestive absorption
the passage of the end products of digestion from the gastrointestinal tract into the blood and lymphatic vessels and the cells of tissues. Absorption of this kind can take place either by diffusion or by active transport.
percutaneous absorption
a passive process in which noxious or therapeutic substances pass through the skin into the body.
radiation absorption
the dissipation of radiant energy as it passes through matter. This phenomenon is of particular importance in diagnostic and therapeutic radiology, which depends on the interaction between ionizing radiations and matter. As radiation passes through matter, it is absorbed by an amount dependent on the atomic and molecular structure and thickness of the substance, and the energy of the primary photons. If radiations pass through a medium of living or nonliving material without absorption (loss of energy), no biological or photographic effects can occur. In true absorption the photons of radiation waves give up or transfer all of their energy to electrons within the atoms of the matter through which they are passing.
absorption tests
are used to assess absorptive function of the small intestine. Glucose, d-xylose and fats are substances administered orally and at timed intervals later measured in the blood. See also digestive absorption (above), fat absorption test.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the Absorption Spectrum of Noble Gases at the Arc Spectrum Limit
In a recent work ([1]) BEUTLER investigated absorption spectra of noble gases, obtaining the following results.
For the more tightly cured compounds, the higher concentration of nearby uncleaved bonds maintains the network and so reduces cracking and fluid absorption.
The apartment rental market -- multifamily housing -- should see a net absorption of 260,000 units in the 57 markets tracked this year, compared with only 159,400 in 2003.