Absidia

Absidia

 
a genus of perfect fungi; the species A. ramo´sa is found on decaying plants and baked goods and can cause mucormycosis.

Absidia

(ab-sid'ē-ă),
A genus of fungi (family Mucoraceae) commonly found in nature. Thermophilic species survive in compost piles at temperatures exceeding 45°C and may cause mucormycosis (zygomycosis) in humans.

Absidia

/Ab·sid·ia/ (-sid´e-ah) a genus of fungi of the order Mucorales. A. corymbi´fera and several other species may cause mycosis in humans. A. ramo´sa grows on bread and decaying vegetation and causes otomycosis and sometimes mucormycosis.

Absidia

[absid′ē·ə]
a genus of fungi belonging to the class Phycomycetes of the order Mucorales, which currently contains 21 species, most of which are soil-borne. A. corymbifera is the only recognized pathogen of the Absidia species and causes zygomycosis (mucormycosis), but is relatively rare. A. corymbifera is found on decaying plants and baked goods.
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Absidia species

Ab·sid·i·a

(ab-sid'ē-ă)
A genus of fungi commonly found in nature. Thermophilic species survive in compost piles at temperatures exceeding 45°C and may cause zygomycosis in humans. A zygomycete, Absidia is differentiated from other members by the presence of rhizoids that are produced between sporangiophores.

Absidia

A genus of fungi that can cause MUCORMYCOSIS. Absidia species may be thermophilic and can survive high temperatures in composting enclosures.

Absidia

a genus of nonseptate fungi in the class Zygomycetes. A. corymbifera (A. ramosa) causes bovine abortion resulting from a severe placentitis. Absidia spp. are also associated with zygomycosis, causing disease of the gastrointestinal tract, and less commonly oral cavity, larynx and subcutaneous tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Species of Absidia, Cephalosporium, Cladosporium, Mucor and Nigrospora were isolated generally at trace levels.
Commonly reported infections belong to the first three genera, Rhizopus, Absidia and Rhizomucor (1-3).
Apophysomyces elegans was isolated in four cases, Saksenaea vasiformis in one and Absidia corymbifera in one.
elegans closely resembles Absidia species in producing pyriform, apophyseal, multispored sporangia on sporangiophores which arise on stolons but typically not opposite rhizoids (Fig.
Corymbifera grows readily upon subculture on routine mycology media, growing more rapidly at 37[degrees]C than at 25[degrees]C and it is capable of growth at temperatures up to 48 to 52[degrees]C, which distinguishes it from other Absidia species (22).
Mucormycosis is caused by fungi of the order of Mucorales and Entomophthorales; among the genera are Absidia, Mucor, and Rhizopus.
The abdominal wound was complicated by a fungal infection involving Aspergillus species, Absidia species, and Rhizopus species.
The most common agents in human infection comprise the genera Rhizopus, Mucor, Absidia, Apophysomyces, Cunninghamella, Rhizomucor, and Saksenaea.
The 3 pathogens from this order seen most often in humans include the genera Absidia, Mucor, and Rhizopus, with Rhizopus being the most common.
1 Absidia corymbifera, 1 Exophiala jeanselmeii, 1 Alternaria tenuissima, 1 Myceliophtora spp.
Most pathogenic species are members of the family Mucoraceae, which includes the genera Absidia, Mucor, Rhizomucor, and Rhizopus.
Cutaneous mucormycosis is an uncommon, life-threatening, opportunistic fungal infection caused by organisms of the class Zygomycetes, most commonly those of the genera Rhizopus, Mucor, Rhizomucor, and Absidia.