abrasion

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abrasion

 [ah-bra´zhun]
1. the wearing away of a substance or structure, such as the skin or teeth, through some unusual or abnormal process.
2. a wound caused by rubbing or scraping the skin or a mucous membrane; a “skinned knee” and a “floor burn” are common examples. To treat the injury, the wound should be washed, a mild antiseptic or antibiotic ointment applied, and the wound covered with sterile gauze.
air abrasion a type of microabrasion in which a jet of air blows tiny particles against the tooth or cavity surface.

a·bra·sion

(ă-brā'zhŭn),
1. An excoriation, or circumscribed removal of the superficial layers of skin or mucous membrane. Synonym(s): abraded wound
2. A scraping away of a portion of the surface.
3. In dentistry, the pathologic grinding or wearing away of tooth substance by incorrect tooth-brushing methods, the presence of foreign objects, bruxism, or similar causes. Synonym(s): grinding Compare: attrition.
[see abrade]

abrasion

/abra·sion/ (ah-bra´zhun)
1. a rubbing or scraping off through unusual or abnormal action; see also planing.
2. a rubbed or scraped area on skin or mucous membrane.

abrasion

(ə-brā′zhən)
n.
1. The process of wearing down or rubbing away by means of friction.
2.
a. A scraped or worn area.
b. A scraped area on the skin or on a mucous membrane, resulting from injury or irritation.

abrasion

[əbrā′zhən]
Etymology: L, abradere, to scrape off
a scraping or rubbing away of a surface, such as skin or teeth, by a substance or surface with a hardness greater than that of the tissue being scraped or rubbed away. Abrasion may be the result of trauma, such as a skinned knee; of therapy, as in dermabrasion for the removal of scar tissue; or of normal function, such as the wearing down of a tooth by mastication. Compare laceration. See also bruxism, friction burn. abrade, v., abrasive, adj.
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Abrasion of the skin

abrasion

Dentistry
The wearing away of enamel.
 
Dermatology
A scrape; superficial injury to a mucocutaneous surface caused by rubbing or scraping from a sharp object, resulting in an area of body surface denuded of skin or mucous membrane; a partial-thickness injury of the skin.

Forensics
Graze, grazing wound, which can occur naturally (e.g., falling off a push-bike on gravel) or unnaturally (e.g., being thrown from a vehicle in an RTA/MVA).

Industry
The wearing away of surface material, such as refractories in an incinerator or parts of solid waste-handling equipment, by the scouring action of moving solids, liquids, or gas; the removal of surface material from any solid through the frictional action of another solid, liquid or gas, or a combination thereof.

Pathology
The wearing away of a substance or structure, such as the skin or the teeth, through a mechanical process.

abrasion

Dentistry The wearing away of enamel Dermatology A scrape; superficial injury to a mucocutaneous surface caused by rubbing or scraping from a sharp object, resulting in an area of body surface denuded of skin or mucous membrane Pathology The wearing away of a substance or structure–such as the skin or the teeth through a mechanical process

a·bra·sion

(ă-brā'zhŭn)
1. An excoriation, or circumscribed removal of the superficial layers of skin or mucous membrane.
Synonym(s): abraded wound.
2. A scraping away of a portion of the surface.
3. In dentistry, the pathologic grinding or wearing away of tooth substance by incorrect tooth-brushing methods, the presence of foreign objects, bruxism, or similar causes.
Synonym(s): grinding.
See: abrade
See also: bruxism
Compare: attrition

abrasion

(a-bra'zhon) [L. abradere, to scrape]
1. Wearing away of the substance of a tooth. It usually results from mastication but may be produced by mechanical or chemical means.
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ABRASION
2. Scraping away of skin or mucous membrane as a result of injury or by mechanical means, as in dermabrasion for cosmetic purposes. See: illustration; avulsion; bruise

pleural abrasion

Mechanical pleurodesis.

abrasion

Wearing away of tissue by sustained or heavy friction between surfaces. Abrasion of the biting surfaces of teeth is common. Skin abrasions are among the commonest of all minor injuries. Deliberate abrasion in the cosmetic treatment of ACNE scars or other disfigurement is called dermabrasion.

Abrasion

Also called a scrape. The rubbing away of the skin surface by friction against another rough surface.
Mentioned in: Corneal Abrasion, Wounds

abrasion

superficial injury to skin or mucous membrane from scraping or rubbing.

a·bra·sion

(ă-brā'zhŭn)
1. In dentistry, the pathologic grinding or wearing away of tooth substance by incorrect tooth-brushing methods, the presence of foreign objects, bruxism, or similar causes.
Synonym(s): grinding.
2. An excoriation or circumscribed removal of the superficial layers of skin or mucous membrane.

abrasion (əbrā´zhən),

n 1. the abnormal wearing away of a substance or tissue by a mechanical process.
n 2. the pathologic wearing away of tooth structure by an external mechanical source, most commonly incorrect toothbrushing methods.
Enlarge picture
Abrasion.
abrasion, dentifrice,
n the wearing away of the cementum and dentin of an exposed root by an abrasive-containing dentifrice.
abrasion resistance,

abrasion

a wound caused by rubbing or scraping the skin or mucous membrane. A 'skinned knee' and a 'rope burn' are common examples.

dental abrasion
abnormal wearing away of tooth substance caused by mechanical process such as chewing of rocks or metal cages.

Patient discussion about abrasion

Q. Eczema tic itching leads making his skin reddish and abraded. My brothers eczema is very vulnerable to allergens. In spite of steps taken to eliminate this we have not succeeded much. His medicines do not help him. They cannot cure this immune disorder. They have started showing some side effects. His fight for eczema tic itching starts again once he stops his medicines. Eczema tic itching leads making his skin reddish and abraded. If any diet can help then please guide?

A. Though food can also trigger eczema symptoms. Thus you must avoid cow`s milk, eggs, shellfish. Avoid dusty areas, pollution. His doctor would have told about the allergens to be avoided just follow them. You can also make him have raw food. It’s said that they help reduce on the return of the symptoms. Use anything as natural as possible, like soaps, clothing and anything which is unnatural. This will help for the eczematic impact to reduce.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OUi3KAUCog&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/v6OUi3KAUCog_eczema_tips?q=eczema&feature=player_embedded

More discussions about abrasion
References in periodicals archive ?
On turf, players on both sides are getting abrasions," he says.
At that time, Mitsubishi Motors reported to the transport ministry that abrasion of the hubs was unlikely on buses because the vehicles do not run at high speeds and therefore there was little burden on the hubs.
Therban HNBR is said to give products superior performance and durability in applications where extreme temperature, fuel, oil, ozone or abrasion exists.
I've used it for ankle sprains, thigh bruises and abrasions for athletes at all levels and have seen great results with it.
But there was an abrasion from the rubbing against the toes, and a wound that had progressed.
The new consumer brand, Dermacyn(TM) Wound Care OTC, is intended for general-purpose use, including moistening of absorbent wound dressing and cleaning minor and superficial skin abrasions.
Parvinchiha and Cunnan, also former Hart basketball players, were treated at Red Butte Hospital for cuts and abrasions.
Capacitive touch screen technology offers fast, reliable and accurate performance, resisting scratches, abrasions and everyday contaminants.
She received severe and permanent injuries, including severe lacerations and abrasions to her face, shoulders, upper and lower extremities, and fractures to both of her feet, as well as severe emotional distress and trauma.
Many of the more than 15 million diabetics in the United States suffer from dry skin problems on a daily basis, and cuts and abrasions require a significantly longer time to heal than those of the non-diabetic population," commented Mark E.
22 AWG cable has 85% copper braid coverage to help resist nicks and abrasions and to provide shielding when the braid is terminated.