abfraction


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abfraction

 [ab-frak´shun]
pathological loss of tooth structure owing to biomechanical forces (flexion, compression, or tension) or chemical degradation; it is most visible as V-shaped notches in the cervical area of a tooth.

abfraction

(ab-frak'shŭn),
To break away.

abfraction

pathological loss of tooth structure owing to biomechanical forces or chemical degradation; it is most visible as V-shaped notches in the cervical area of the tooth.

ab·frac·tion

(ab-frak'shŭn)
Pathologic loss of hard tooth substance caused by biomechanical loading forces.
[ab- + L. fractio, a breaking, fr. frango, fractum, to break]

ab·frac·tion

(ab-frak'shŭn)
Loss of tooth structure considered due to combined stress on tooth, resulting from flexure and chemical factors; usually evident as a notch on the buccal surface just occlusal to the adjacent gingiva.
[ab- + L. fractio, a breaking, Fr. frango, fractum, to break]

abfraction (abfrak´shən),

n a mechanism that explains the loss of dentin tissue and tooth enamel caused by flexure and ultimate material fatigue of susceptible teeth at locations away from the point of loading. The breakdown is dependent on the magnitude, duration, frequency, and location of the forces.
References in periodicals archive ?
The non-carious cervical lesions are further categorised into abrasion, erosion and abfraction.
The role of cuspal flexure in the development of abfraction lesions: A finite element study.
Signs of excessive tooth flexure can be excessive enamel crazing, tooth and restoration wear, tooth and restoration fracture, microleakage at restoration margins, recession and abfraction lesions.
Sleep bruxism can cause severe attrition that leads to exposed dentin, abfraction, tooth mobility and tooth fracture.
An assessment of stress analyses in the theory of abfraction.
Effect of root morphology on biomechanical behavior of premolars associated with abfraction lesions and different loading types.
This exposure can be the result of numerous etiologic factors that include abrasion, erosion, attrition, abfraction, and gingival recession.
There are no cavities, dental enamel hypoplasia, erosions, or abfraction lesions, which reveals a good state of oral health.
However, it was a disappointment that abfraction was not discussed in the oral examination portion.
3 Gingival recession, pocket formation, abrasion, erosion, attrition, abfraction, overzealous tooth brushing and periodontal procedures are common possible causative factors which often result in the exposure of dentinal tubules and ultimately lead to DH.
Attrition, abrasion, corrosion and abfraction revisited.
Association between self-reported bruxism activity and occurrence of dental attrition, abfraction, and occlusal pits on natural teeth.