anterior talofibular ligament

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an·te·ri·or ta·lo·fib·u·lar lig·a·ment

[TA]
the band of fibers that extends from the lateral malleolus to the neck of the talus.

anterior talofibular ligament

A ligament of the ankle that passes from the anterior margin of the lateral (fibular) malleolus, anteriorly and medially, to the talus bone, in front of its lateral articular facet. It is a lateral ankle ligament that prevents the foot from sliding forward in relation to the shin.

anterior talofibular ligament

the ligament on the outside of the ankle joint, which is commonly injured in exercise. Runs from the fibula to the talus, preventing excessive forward movement of the foot relative to the tibia.

anterior talofibular ligament

; ATFL most anterior lateral ankle ligament, extending from anterior inferior fibula to the body and neck of talus; it tenses during ankle plantarflexion (Figure 1)
Figure 1: Lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle. PTFL, posterior talofibular ligament; CFL, calcaneofibular ligament; ATFL, anterior talofibular ligament.
References in periodicals archive ?
Click on the following link to view the full text of the ATFL letter about the problem of cluster bomblets in south Lebanon and ATFL's campaign to address the problem:
The CFL also forms the floor of the peroneal tendon sheath and is larger and stronger than the ATFL.
The ATFL forms a 47[degrees] angle to the sagittal plane and 25[degrees] angle to the horizontal plane and is the primary restraint against plantar flexion and internal rotation of the foot.
The ATFL followed by the CFL are the most commonly injured ligaments.
Careful palpation can confirm the structures involved in the injury--localized ATFL tenderness is exhibited at 4 to 7 days post injury, while CFL injury can be diagnosed with tenderness at the calcaneal insertion.
The anterior drawer test assesses the integrity of the ATFL as the ATFL prevents anterior translation of the talus with respect to the tibia.
The diagnostic accuracy for ATFL tears by ultrasound is 95% and for CFL tears is 90%.
The calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) originates on the anterior border of the distal fibula just below the origin of the ATFL.
The lateral talocalcaneal ligament originates on the lateral wall of the calcaneus just anterior to the origin of the CFL and inserts onto the body of the talus just inferior to the ATFL.
6) During plantar flexion, it resists adduction in combination with the ATFL.
Following sectioning, or rupture of the ATFL, it restricts internal rotation.
As a result of the fact that the ATFL has a lower load to failure than the other ligaments of the ankle, combined with the common mechanism of injury of plantar flexion and inversion, the ATFL is the ligament most commonly injured.