ASD


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atrial

 [a´tre-al]
pertaining to an atrium.
atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) a hormone produced in the cardiac atrium; it inhibits renin secretion and thus the production of angiotensin, and stimulates aldosterone release. Its effect is increased excretion of water and sodium and a lowering of blood pressure, which reduces the workload of the heart.
atrial septal defect a congenital heart defect in which the ostium primum or ostium secundum, openings in the septum primum of the embryonic heart, fail to close completely after birth. When an opening remains between the atria, some of the oxygen-rich blood from the left atrium passes into the right atrium and travels back to the lungs without being first transported through the body.
 Atrial septal defect. The shunt is from left atrium to right atrium. From Betz et al., 1994.

defect

 [de´fekt]
an imperfection, failure, or absence.
congenital heart defect see congenital heart defect.
aortic septal defect see aortic septal defect.
atrial septal defect see atrial septal defect.
filling defect an interruption in the contour of the inner surface of stomach or intestine revealed by radiography, indicating excess tissue or substance on or in the wall of the organ.
neural tube defect see neural tube defect.
septal defect a defect in the cardiac septum resulting in an abnormal communication between opposite chambers of the heart. Common types are aortic septal defect, atrial septal defect, and ventricular septal defect. See also congenital heart defect.

ASD

ASD

abbreviation for atrial septal defect.

ASD

Abbreviation for:
acute stress disorder
adaptive seating device
adult Still’s disease
aldosterone secretion defect
Alzheimer’s senile dementia
androstenedione
arthroscopic subacromial decompression
atrial-septal defect
autism spectrum disorder (Medspeak-UK)
autosensitisation spongiotic dermatitis

ASD

Atrial septal defect, see there.

ASD

Abbreviation for acute stress disorder;
atrial septal defect.

acute stress disorder

,

ASD

The emotional and behavioral consequences of a sudden alteration in one's sense of safety. They include intense anxiety, fear or helplessness, or dissociative symptoms.

device

(di-vis') [Fr. devis, contrivance]
An apparatus, tool, or machine made for a specific function.
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ABDUCTION DEVICE

abduction device

A trapezoidal pillow, wedge, or splint placed between the arm and torso to prevent adduction. It is commonly used postoperatively for patients having total joint replacement or open reduction or internal fixation of the hip or shoulder.
See: illustration

adaptive device

Assistive technology.

adaptive seating device

Abbreviation: ASD
A device that provides a proper sitting position for those with limited motor control. Such devices include seating inserts, wheelchairs, and postural support systems designed to prevent deformities and enhance function.
Synonym: seating system

assistive technology device

Assistive technology.

augmentative device

A device that helps people with limited or no speech to communicate. Examples include communication boards, pictographs, or ideographs (symbols representing ideas, not sounds).
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BAG MASK DEVICE

bag mask device

A manually operated resuscitator used to ventilate a nonbreathing patient or assist the ventilation of a patient who is not breathing at an effective rate or tidal volume. The device consists of a bag, an oxygen reservoir system, a one-way flow valve, and a clear face mask. It is designed to be attached to an oxygen source by tubing to deliver concentrations approaching 100%.
See: illustration

belay device

A device using friction to brake or slow the movement of a rope, or to protect a patient, basket, climber, or other rescuer.

biventricular assist device

Abbreviation: BiVAD
A device that helps both ventricles of the heart contract more effectively. It is used to treat heart failure by propelling blood out of the chambers of the heart.

cardiac rhythm management device

Abbreviation: CRMD
An umbrella term for pacemakers and implantable cardioverter/defibrillators.

cervical immobilization device

Abbreviation: CID
A stiff neck brace or collar to prevent movement of the cervical spine in order to maintain spinal alignment and prevent injury or paralysis.

charge-coupled device

Abbreviation: CCD
A device used in video and digital imaging (such as in CT scanning) that creates electronic images from light.

clitoral vacuum device

A mechanical device used to engorge and stimulate the clitoris. It is used as a U.S. FDA–approved treatment for female sexual dysfunction.

electronic infusion device

Abbreviation: EID
A device for monitoring intravenous infusions. The device may have an alarm in case the flow is restricted because of an occlusion of the line. In that case, the alarm will sound when a preset pressure limit is sensed. The device can also signal that an infusion is close to completion. The pressure is regulated by the height at which the container is positioned above the level of the heart when the patient is lying flat. A height of 36 in (91 cm) provides a pressure of 1.3 lb/sq in (70 mm Hg). Most EIDs are equipped to stop the flow of the infused liquid if accidental free flow occurs.
See: infusion pump

esophageal intubation detector device

A syringe attached to the endotracheal tube immediately after an intubation attempt.

Patient care

If aspiration is difficult or stomach contents are withdrawn, or both, the endotracheal (ET) tube may have been placed in the esophagus and needs to be removed and reinserted. If aspiration is easy and free of stomach contents, it is probable that the ET tube is located in the trachea; the rescuer should then confirm tube placement by other techniques, e.g., a combination of auscultation, x-ray, and pulse oximetry.

femoral compression device

A device used to apply pressure to the large artery or vein in the thigh after it has been cannulated in order to reduce bleeding from the punctured vessel. Femoral compression devices are used, e.g., after angiography.

flow-restricted oxygen-powered ventilation device

Abbreviation: FROPVD
A ventilation device that provides a peak flow rate of 100% oxygen at up to 40 L/min. See: oxygen-powered ventilation device

Flutter device

See: Flutter device

head immobilization device

A device that attaches to a long back board and holds the patient's head in neutral alignment.
See: long back board

humanitarian use device

Humanitarian device exemption.

improvised explosive device

Abbreviation: IED
Military jargon for a homemade bomb or land mine used in unconventional warfare.

input device

In assistive technology, the device that activates an electronic device. This can be a manual switch, a remote control, or a joystick.
See: switch

inspiratory impedance threshold device

Inspiratory impedance threshold valve.

intrauterine contraceptive device

Abbreviation: IUCD, IUD
See: intrauterine contraceptive device.

Kendrick extrication device

See: Kendrick extrication device

left ventricular assist device

Abbreviation: LVAD
A pump surgically implanted in patients with severe heart failure to move blood from the left ventricle to the ascending aorta. The LVAD usually augments the heart's function until it heals (following a severe myocardial infarction) or until a heart transplant becomes available, e.g., for patients with heart failure with a markedly diminished ejection fraction. The LVAD also may be used permanently for a patient who does not meet criteria for transplantation.

listening device

A speech amplifier that aids the hearing-impaired in direct person-to-person communication or telephone conversation. Such devices differ from conventional hearing aids in that they reduce interference from background noises.

medical device

Any health care product that is intended for the diagnosis, prevention, or treatment of disease and does not primarily work by effecting a chemical change in the body

mobility device

Any assistive technology that aids the movement of people with physical impairments. Examples include lift chairs, scooters, or wheelchairs.

needleless device

A device that has no exposed sharp surface, used to inject drugs and fluids. It is designed to decrease the risk of needle-stick injuries by health care professionals.

oxygen-conserving device

Abbreviation: OCR
Any device that reduces the loss of administered oxygen into the environment, e.g., one that releases oxygen to a patient only when the patient inhales.

oxygen-powered ventilation device

A multifunction ventilation devicehat uses high-flow oxygen. This device can often be triggered by negative pressure caused by an inhaling patient; it can also be operated by a button while the operator watches the patient's chest rise.

CAUTION!

During resuscitation, it is necessary to use the positive-pressure aspect of this device and manually trigger or compress the button because the patient cannot open the valve by inhaling. These devices should be fitted with an overinflation high-pressure alarm to avoid gastric distention and/or barotrauma.

personal flotation device

Abbreviation: PFD
A life vest to prevent drowning and near drowning. People engaged in water sports, such as boating or water skiing, or rescuers working on or near the water should wear PFDs at all times. The U.S. Coast Guard sets standards and establishes specifications for the manufacture and use of PFDs. Personal flotation devices may be used to provide added buoyancy for the patient during aquatic therapy.

personal assistive mobility device

Personal mobility device.

personal mobility device

Any assistive device that facilitates individual human transportation. Examples include powered wheelchairs, scooters, bicycles and unicycles. Although many such devices are used by people with activity or mobility restrictions, mobility aids can be employed generally, e.g., for urban transportation in place of automobiles.
Synonym: personal assistive mobility device

pointing device

A type of input device for sending commands to a computer. Moving the device results in movement of a cursor on the monitor or computer screen. Pointing devices range from the conventional desktop mouse, trackball, and touch-sensitive screens to infrared and ultrasound pointers mounted on the head.
See: light pointer; switch

position-indicating device

Abbreviation: PID
A device to guide the direction of the x-ray beam during the exposure of dental radiographs. This devices improves and standardizes dental radiographic imaging and reduces the patient's risk of radiation exposure.

positive beam limiting device

A collimator that automatically adjusts the size of the radiation field to match the size of the imaging device. Synonym: automatic collimator

powered mobility device

Abbreviation: PMD
Any assistive device (such as a powered wheelchair, a lift chair, or a scooter) that improves the movement of the functionally impaired.

pressure relief device

An appliance filled with air, water, gel, or foam, to reduce pressure points caused by the patient’s body weight when seated or bedridden. Examples include wheelchair cushions and air or water flotation mattresses.

prosthetic terminal device

A component of an upper extremity prosthesis that substitutes for the functions of the hand. There are many types of terminal devices, some of which are designed for use with specific tools and implements. These devices have two primary actions: voluntary opening and voluntary closing.
Synonym: hook

protective device

An external support applied to vulnerable joints or other body parts to guard against injury. Protective devices include helmets, braces, tape or wrapping, and padding.

pubovaginal device

A device fitted for use in the vagina to help prevent urinary incontinence.
See: pessary

sequential compression device

Abbreviation: SCD.
A device to reduce edema or prevent the formation of blod clots in an extremity. A chambered nylon sleeve is progressively inflated from its distal segment to the proximal segment, forcing venous and lymphatic return. Sequential compression devices are inflated with air (pneumatic compression) or, less commonly, chilled water (cryocompression). SCDs are used frequently in the perioperative period. See: intermittent compression

single-use device

A medical device used once for the care of a single patient and then immediately discarded.

spine arthroplasty device

A prosthesis to replace a damaged intervertebral disk.

superconductive quantum interference device

Abbreviation: SQUID
A biomagnetometer used to measure magnetic fields in the body or the presence of magnetically active elements or minerals, such as body stores of iron.

telecommunication device for the deaf

Abbreviation: TDD
A device that allows the hearing-impaired to use the telephone even if they cannot comprehend speech. A keyboard and display screen are used.
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VENOUS ACCESS DEVICES: A. An over-the-needle catheter; B. An inside-the-needle catheter.
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VENOUS ACCESS DEVICES: A. An over-the-needle catheter; B. An inside-the-needle catheter.

venous access device

A specially designed catheter for gaining and maintaining access to the venous system. This device provides access for patients who require intravenous fluids or medications for several days or more, e.g., those having a bone marrow transplant or who are receiving long-term total parenteral nutrition. See: venous port
See: illustration

ventricular assist device

Abbreviation: VAD
A pump to treat heart failure. It helps the ventricles to contract and move blood to the lungs and/or the aorta.
See: left ventricular assist device

adaptive seating device

Abbreviation: ASD
A device that provides a proper sitting position for those with limited motor control. Such devices include seating inserts, wheelchairs, and postural support systems designed to prevent deformities and enhance function.
Synonym: seating system
See also: device

ASD

Abbreviation for atrial septal defect.

Patient discussion about ASD

Q. In the future will he with ASD ever be able to live independently? I have a friend who is staying as a paying guest and is being taken care of by all our family members. In the future will he with ASD ever be able to live independently?

A. I am very much moved by your deeds.

• Many people with autism do flourish and go on to hold responsible jobs and live independently. Others have the intellectual abilities to be employed but are held back by their inability to adapt socially to the stresses of everyday life.

• The focus of every intervention program for the person with autism should be to work on helping them adapt to living in society. Their quality of life and ability to function is far more important than how they do on an I.Q. test.

More discussions about ASD
References in periodicals archive ?
Hawkins stated that ASD will also continue to work hand in hand with their trustees, corporate sponsors and educational partners who have supported them for over 25 years since the establishment of the school.
Carter said future challenges will be to distinguish between three different groups of infants who do not meet the full criteria for an ASD diagnosis: those manifesting symptoms that mark the beginning of the pathway toward ASD or the emergence of ASD (prodromal ASD); those whose symptoms are likely to resolve; and those who show signs of ASD that "will endure and reflect the broader autism phenotype.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network released data in 2007 that found approximately 1 in 150 8-year-old children in multiple areas of the United States had an ASD.
Through statistical analysis, establish a lack of correlation between ASD and component failures
ASD had its origins in 1947, when it stood up as the Research and Analysis Group, Town Plan Group and Cartographic Unit of the G2 Geographic Section under General MacArthur's General Headquarters in downtown Tokyo.
The team decided to postpone a planned ASD reorganization in the near term and focus on the development of a process-based understanding of the business before taking any further action.
Children diagnosed with ASD increased by 63 percent in Canada between 1999 and 2000.
In A Dialogue Between a Liar and a Friend of Truth, Philetymus remarks that liars are also prone to stealing; "this vice," he tells the liar, "is closely related to yours, as is also attested by a popular proverb" (Hoc vitium esse tuo cognatum testatur etiam populare prouerbium, ASD, 1, 3: 320, lines 10-12).
Your article criticising the ASD school car parade [May 30] is ridiculous.
In addition to the broader category of ASD, we also evaluated autistic disorder and ASD with regression.
The number of students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has risen significantly in recent years (CDC, 2012), and students with ASD present unique challenges to schools and school counselors.
SynapDx has the potential to revolutionize ASD diagnosis and offer pediatricians, patients and families the opportunity to begin treatment earlier, a key factor in improving ASD outcomes," said David King, Chairman and CEO, LabCorp.