Aid to Families with Dependent Children

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Related to AFDC: Food stamps

Aid to Families with Dependent Children

A US federal assistance program administered by the Department of Health and Human Services from 1935 until 1996, when it was replaced by the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. The AFDC provided financial assistance to children whose families had low or no income.
References in periodicals archive ?
it], includes the dollar amount of income received from child support and alimony payments and the dollar amount of benefits received from AFDC.
Of those who began a Medicaid spell on AFDC or AFDC-UP, 34 and 31 percent, respectively, ended the spell on the Edward-Meyers program.
Buckley and Brinig (1996) find that an increase in AFDC payments increases the state bankruptcy filing rate.
Our review of the literature indicates that in either the AFDC or TANF policy environment, welfare recipients' lives after exiting from welfare are by no means easy.
Because of the small sample size of the individual disorders and the lack of significant bivariate results, we examined the associations among race, AFDC status, and psychiatric disorders using the composite "any disorder" variable rather than the individual disorders.
it], we consider those affecting AFDC and food stamp rules.
Although 19 percent to 30 percent of AFDC recipients are married women (Moffitt, Reville, & Winkler, 1998), studies have shown consistently that single mothers are likely to stay longer in supplementation or dependency than married people (Bane & Ellwood, 1983; Cheng, 1995; Coe, 1981; Dickinson, 1986; Osmond & Grigg, 1978).
Goals of AFDC and TANE: AFDC's goals were to encourage the care of needy children in their homes, promote family self-support, and strengthen family life (Committee on Ways and Means, 1998).
In general, the Categorically Needy (all AFDC recipients and their families) have been eligible for Medicaid in all states.
For example, bladder and urethral infections were diagnosed for 95,000, or 10 percent, of our sample of adults with disability and more than 185,000, or 12 percent, of AFDC adults.
Between the inception of AFDC and the present, a major change has taken place in the reasons for a child's dependency on the program.
Believe it or not, a 1973 report issued by President Nixon's Department of Health, Education, and Welfare also justified AFDC grants as payment for non-market work: "The choice confronting the AFDC mother," it declared, "should no longer be between taking a job or receiving no assistance (which really is no choice at all), but rather the choice between working at home, in her own house with her own children, or working outside the home.