Aspergillus flavus

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As·per·gil·lus fla·vus

a fungal species with yellow-green conidia that is found growing on grains; may produce aflatoxin, which is the cause of aflatoxicosis in poultry and cattle and carcinogenic for rats and possibly humans; causes invasive aspergillosis in humans and animals.

As·per·gil·lus fla·vus

(aspĕr-jilŭs flāvŭs)
A hyaline septate fungal species widely found in soil and decaying matter. Associated with respiratory infections and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Produces aflatoxins responsible for mycotoxicoses; may produce invasive disease in the granulocytopenic patient.

Aspergillus flavus

A species found on corn, peanuts, and grain. It is a plant, animal and human pathogen. After A. fumigatus, A. flavus is the second most common cause of aspergillosis of the lung. Other common clinical syndromes associated with A. flavus include chronic granulomatous sinusitis, keratitis, cutaneous aspergillosis, wound infections and osteomyelitis following trauma and inoculation. This species of Aspergillus can produce significant quantities of aflatoxin, a carcinogenic and acutely toxic compound.
See also: Aspergillus
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger were resistant to the extracts, essential oils of E sideroxylon and E torquata generally exhibited moderate to high antifungal activities against Candida albicans, A flavus and A niger.
At the end of therapy, she exhibited no evidence of A flavus on physical and mycologic examinations.
The mycologic analysis identified the pathogen as A flavus.
Subsequent to the histopathologic diagnosis of aspergillosis and the mycologic identification of A flavus as the responsible agent, a second nasopharyngeal biopsy was performed, and it ruled out an invasive mucosal infection.
At the end of itraconazole therapy, we found no evidence of A flavus on physical and mycologic examinations.
5) Oxalic acid is a mycotoxin produced by A niger and occasionally by other Aspergillus species, including A flavus and A fumigatus.
A flavus has a worldwide distribution, and it normally exists as a saprophyte in soil and on many types of decaying organic matter.
Tissue cultures and histopathology detected the presence of A flavus.