acyclovir

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acyclovir

 [a-si´klo-vir]
a synthetic acyclic purine nucleoside with selective antiviral activity against the human herpesviruses, used in treatment of genital and mucocutaneous herpesvirus infections in both immunocompromised patients and those who are not. Administered orally, topically, or intravenously.

acyclovir

/acy·clo·vir/ (a-si´klo-vēr) a synthetic purine nucleoside with selective activity against herpes simplex virus; used as the base or the sodium salt in the treatment of genital and mucocutaneous herpesvirus infections.

acyclovir

(ā-sī′klō-vîr, -klə-)
n.
A synthetic purine nucleoside analog, C8H10N5O3, derived from guanine and used in the treatment of herpes simplex, herpes zoster, and varicella-zoster virus infections.

acyclovir

[əsī′klōvir]
an antiviral agent with activity against herpesvirus types 1 and 2 and varicella zoster virus. Acyclovir is converted by a herpesvirus enzyme into a molecule (acyclovir triphosphate) that inhibits the synthesis of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules in the virally infected cells, thereby inhibiting viral replication.
indications It is prescribed topically in an ointment for the treatment of herpes simplex lesions (cold sores) and both orally and systemically (oral and IV) in other types of herpes infections, including genital herpes, herpes encephalitis, chickenpox (varicella zoster), and shingles (herpes zoster).
contraindication Known sensitivity to this drug prohibits its use.
adverse effects After topical use, irritation or pruritus may occur; after systemic use, diaphoresis, headache, and nausea may occur. When it is administered intravenously in the treatment of immunosuppressed patients, there may be pain at the site of the injection, and 1% to 10% of such patients experience acute renal failure.

Acyclovir

A nucleoside analogue used to manage viral infections in patients with bone marrow transplants, chemotherapy-induced or acquired immunosuppression—e.g., AIDS.
Indications HSV-1, HSV-2, HVZ, and CMV. Acyclovir is considered safe for paediatric chickenpox (varicella-zoster) if begun in the first 24 hours of rash, although it is unclear if it reduces the rare serious complications of chickenpox or is more effective than vidarabine in reducing viral shedding by HSV-infected infants. 
Adverse effects Upset stomach, headache, nausea; hair loss with chronic use.

acyclovir

Zovirax Infectious disease A nucleoside analogue used to manage viral infections in Pts with BMTs, chemotherapy-induced or acquired immunosuppression–eg, AIDS Indications HSV-1, HSV-2, HVZ Adverse effects Upset stomach, headache, nausea; hair loss from prolonged use. Cf Foscarnet, Gancyclovir.

Acyclovir

An antiviral drug that is available under the trade name Zovirax, in oral, intravenous, and topical forms. The drug blocks the replication of the varicella zoster virus.
Mentioned in: Chickenpox, Shingles

acyclovir (aˈ·sīˑ·klō·virˈ),

n antiviral medication used topically to combat herpes virus types 1 and 2 as well as the varicella zoster and other viruses.

antiviral agents 

Substances which inhibit the growth of a virus (e.g. herpes) by inhibiting DNA or RNA synthesis. Common agents include aciclovir (acyclovir), idoxuridine, ganciclovir, trifluoridine (trifluorothymidine) and vidarabine. See herpetic keratitis; virus.

acyclovir

(ā-sīklō-vir)
A synthetic nucleoside medication used to treat chicken pox, shingles, and the genital form of herpes simplex symptoms.

acyclovir (āsī´klōvir),

n brand name: Zovirax;
drug class: antiviral.
Uses: a 5% ointment; may be used systemically. Drug of choice in simple mucocutaneous herpes simplex, in immunocompromised patients with initial herpes genitalis. Active against herpes viruses such as herpes zoster and varicella (chickenpox).

acyclovir, aciclovir

a synthetic analog of guanosine which selectively interferes with viral DNA synthesis. Used parenterally and topically as an antiviral agent in herpesvirus infections in cats, birds and horse.