Geneva Protocol

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A document prepared by the League of Nations during the 1925 Geneva Conference, which was intended to ban the use of chemical and biological weapons. The protocol didn’t prevent production, storage or transfer of such weapons, a loophole that was closed in the 1972 Biological Weapons Convention and the 1993 Chemical Weapons Convention.

Geneva Protocol

Global village A document prepared by the League of Nations during the 1925 Geneva Conference intended to ban chemical weapons. See Chemical Weapons, Ypres. Cf Geneva Convention.
References in periodicals archive ?
17) In short, Congress understood that the 1925 Geneva Protocol was seriously flawed because it did not address the breakout problem.
Chief Justice Roberts and the Bond majority were apparently unaware of the critical differences between the 1925 Geneva Protocol and the 1993 CWC.
But that is because the majority did not understand that states designed the CWC to remedy the various deficiencies of the 1925 Geneva Protocol.
41) That interpretation of the statute is untenable because it is based on the Court's failure to appreciate the crucial differences between the 1925 Geneva Protocol and the 1993 CWC.
Restricting the use of asphyxiating gases as a method of warfare, the 1925 Geneva Protocol was an early measure of success in attempts to abolish chemical weapons.
Because of their impact on humans and potential to cause unnecessary suffering, these chemicals were prohibited under the 1925 Geneva Protocol, just as the earlier chemical agents had been.
At the time the United States had not yet ratified the 1925 Geneva Protocol banning the use of poisonous gases during war and took the position that, since RCA did not fall into the category of poison gas, no international protocols were being broken.
This was the case in the 1960s when the United States, not restricted under the 1925 Geneva Protocol, decided to use RCAs and chemical defoliants in Vietnam.
One of the Department's smallest offices is tasked with one complicated mission: analyzing and understanding the 1972 Biological and Toxins Weapons Convention and the 1925 Geneva Protocol.
In 1972, nearly half a century after the 1925 Geneva Protocol banned the use of biological weapons, international delegates began signing the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC), all international treaty that further bans their development and possession, except for "prophylactic, protective, or peaceful purposes.
This is to ascertain in an objective and scientific manner facts of alleged violations of the 1925 Geneva Protocol, which bans the use of chemical and biological weapons, or other relevant rules of customary international law.
Due to the horror it caused, chlorine gas, along with other chemical agents, was outlawed by the 1925 Geneva Protocols and that was reinforced by the Chemical Weapons Convention of 1992.