Johnson

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Johnson

 [jon´son]
Dorothy E. Nursing educator and developer of the behavioral system model for nursing. Her chief interest has been in identifying the nature of service provided by nursing and in delineating the knowledge needed to provide that service.

John·son

(jon'sŏn),
Frank B., 20th-century U.S. pathologist. See: Dubin-Johnson syndrome.

John·son

(jon'sŏn),
Frank C., U.S. pediatrician, 1894-1934. See: Stevens-Johnson syndrome.

John·son

(jon'sŏn),
Harry B., U.S. dentist. See: Johnson method.

John·son

(jon'sŏn),
Treat Baldwin, U.S. chemist, 1875-1947. See: Wheeler-Johnson test.

Johnson, Dorothy E.

Etymology: Dorothy E. Johnson, American nurse, b. 1919 d. 1999
a nursing theorist who developed a behavioral systems model presented in Conceptual Models for Nursing Practice (Riehl and Roy, eds., 1973). Johnson's theory addresses two major components: the patient and nursing. The patient is a behavioral system with seven interrelated subsystems. Each subsystem has structural and functional requirements. The structural elements include drive or goal; predisposition to act; choice, alternatives for action; and behavior. The attachment-affiliative subsystem forms the basis for all social organization. The dependency subsystem promotes helping behavior. The biological (ingestive and eliminative) and sexual subsystems have to do with social and psychological functions as well as biological considerations. The function of the achievement subsystem is to attempt to manipulate the environment. The functions of the aggressive subsystem are protection and preservation. Johnson considered that problems in nursing are caused by disturbances in the structure or functions of the subsystems or the system. Her behavioral systems theory provides a conceptual framework for nursing education, practice, and research.