17-ketosteroid


Also found in: Wikipedia.

17-ketosteroid

[kē′tōstir′oid, kētō′stəroid]
any of the adrenal cortical hormones, or ketosteroids, that has a ketone group attached to its seventeenth carbon atom. These hormones are commonly measured in the blood and urine to aid the diagnoses of Addison's disease, Cushing's syndrome, stress, and endocrine problems associated with precocious puberty, feminization in men, and excessive hair growth. Measured in patients in the morning, the normal concentration in plasma is less than 30 μg/dL, in the evening, less than 10 μg/dL. The normal amounts in the urine of men after 24-hour collection are 8 to 15 mg; in women, 6 to 11.5 mg; in children 12 to 15 years of age, 5 to 12 mg; and in children younger than 12 years of age, less than 5 mg. Levels of 17-ketosteroids increase 50% to 100% after an injection of ACTH.

17-ketosteroid

(ke-to-ster'oyd)
One of a group of neutral steroids having a ketone group in carbon position 17. They are produced by the adrenal cortex and gonads and appear normally in the urine. Among them are androsterone, dehydroisoandrosterone, corticosterone, and 11-hydroxyisoandrosterone. A greater than normal or less than normal excretion in the urine is indicative of certain endocrine disorders such as adrenal adenomas or Cushing's syndrome.
See: perhydrocyclopentanophenanthrene
References in periodicals archive ?
Serum cortisol and urine 17-hydroxycorticosteroid, 17-ketosteroid, and titers of serum antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies to thyroid peroxidase were also normal.
The quantitation of major 17-ketosteroid fraction by gas-liquid chromatography.
Quantitative methods for the routine analysis of 17-ketosteroids and catecholamines.
A rapid method for the estimation of urinary 17-ketosteroids.
3 nmol/L) 2 SV Adult body odor and increased growth velocity at 5 years; basal 17OHP, 16 946 ng/dL (509 nmol/L) 6 SV Diagnosed at 10 years with significant virilization including clitoromegaly, hirsutism, muscular habitus, and low voice; bone age, 15 years at chronologic age of 10 years; elevated urinary 17-ketosteroids 7 NC Diagnosed at 28 years with hirsutism, male pattern baldness; basal 17OHP, 740 ng/dL (22 nmol/L); cosyntropin/stimulated 17OHP, 3460 ng/ dL (104 nmol/L); precocious puberty with menarche at age 8 years 7S (c) NC Diagnosed at 62 years secondary to family genetic studies; basal 17OHP, 813 ng/dL (24 nmol/L); cosyntropin/stimulated 17OHP, 7190 ng/ dL (216 nmol/L); menarche at age 9 years (a) 17OHP, 17-hydroxyprogesterone.
The measurement of 17-ketosteroids in a 24-hr urine specimen is the initial test of choice for the detection of an androgen or estrogen excess.
A metabolic workup typically includes serum electrolytes, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, aldosterone, renin, urinary catecholamines, metanephrines, vanillylmandelic acid, 17-ketosteroids, and 17-hydroxycorticoids.
Urine measurement of excretion of 17-ketosteroids (17-KS) and 17-hydroxycorticosteroids (17-OHCS).
This technique replaced other bioassays for pregnancy, including follicle-stimulating hormone, and indirect hormone tests such as 17-ketosteroids.
The 2 most commonly used assays measure urinary excretion of PT, a urinary metabolite of 17OHP, or 17-ketosteroids (17-KS), a urinary metabolite of androgens.
In endocrinology the time-honored procedures for 17-ketosteroids and 17-ketogenic steroids were deleted.