17-hydroxycorticosteroid

17-hydroxycorticosteroid

[-kôr′tikos′təroid]
any steroid hydroxylated at carbon-17 secreted by adrenal glands and occasionally measured in the urine in a test for determining adrenal function and diagnosing hypoadrenalism or hyperadrenalism. The normal accumulation in the urine of men after 24-hour collection is 5.5 to 14.5 μg; in women, 4.9 to 12.9 μg; and in children, slightly less. The levels are normally two to four times higher in all cases after injection of 25 USP units of adrenocorticotropic hormone.

17-hydroxycorticosteroid

Any of the steroid hormones synthesized in the adrenal gland by action of 17-hydroxylase–cortisol, cortisone, 11-deoxycortisol and tetrahydro derivatives; urine excretion of 17-OHCSs is a rough guide of functional status of the adrenal gland and rate of catabolism ↑ in Pregnancy, Cushing's disease, obesity, pancreatitis ↓ in Addison's disease, hypopituitarism Ref range < age 1, 1.4-2.8 µmol/24–US: < 1 mg/24; adult 8.2-27.6 µmol/24–US: 3-11 mg/24
References in periodicals archive ?
First, urinary 17-hydroxycorticosteroid 117 OHCS) level was measured which was normal (11.
Clinically, the most commonly utilized test is measuring the serum or urinary 17-hydroxycorticosteroid level before and after high-dose (8-mg) dexamethasone suppression.
Over 75% of patients achieve normal levels of urinary free cortisol and 17-hydroxycorticosteroid while on ketoconazole (Greenberg, 2001).
Serum cortisol and urine 17-hydroxycorticosteroid, 17-ketosteroid, and titers of serum antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies to thyroid peroxidase were also normal.
The historic 24-h 17-hydroxycorticosteroid test is not recommended as a screening test for Cushing syndrome because of low diagnostic accuracy (12).
A comparative study of urinary 17-hydroxycorticosteroids, urinary free cortisol, and the integrated concentration of plasma cortisol.
17-OHCS 17-hydroxycorticosteroid OM obtuse marginal (coronary
Finally, the book claims that high-dose dexamethasone suppression testing fails to decrease urinary 17-hydroxycorticosteroid production in Cushing disease.
Examples of physiological systems that have been reported to be affected include ACTH, oxytocin, vasopressin, norepinephrine, follicle stimulating hormone, prolactin, and 17-hydroxycorticosteroids, immune, and cardiovascular functions.
The serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level and urinary excretion of 17-hydroxycorticosteroids (OHCS) did not differ among the pregnant groups.
Urine measurement of excretion of 17-ketosteroids (17-KS) and 17-hydroxycorticosteroids (17-OHCS).