iodine

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iodine

 (I) [i´o-dīn]
a chemical element, atomic number 53, atomic weight 126.904. (See Appendix 6.) Iodine is essential in nutrition, being especially prevalent in the colloid of the thyroid gland. It is used in the treatment of hypothyroidism and as a topical antiseptic. Iodine is a frequent cause of poisoning (see iodism). Deficiency of iodine causes goiter. Since iodine salts are opaque to x-rays, they can be combined with other compounds and used as contrast media in diagnostic x-ray examinations of the gallbladder and kidneys.
iodine 123 a radioactive isotope of iodine having a half-life of 13.2 hours and emitting gamma rays and x-rays. It is used in diagnostic imaging and as radiation sources in radiation therapy. Symbol 123I.
iodine 125 a radioisotope of iodine having a half-life of 60.14 days and emitting gamma rays; used as a label in radioimmunoassays and other in vitro tests, and also for thyroid imaging. Symbol 125I.
iodine 131 a radioactive isotope of iodine having a half-life of 8.04 days and emitting beta particles and gamma rays. It is used as a tracer in diagnostic imaging and as a radiation source in radiation therapy. Symbol 131I.
protein-bound iodine a test of thyroid function; see also protein-bound iodine test.
radioactive iodine radioiodine.
iodine solution a transparent, reddish brown liquid, each 100 ml of which contains 1.8 to 2.2 g of iodine and 2.1 to 2.6 g of sodium iodide; a local antiinfective agent.
strong iodine solution Lugol's solution.

i·o·dine (I),

(ī'ō-dīn, -dēn),
A nonmetallic chemical element, atomic no. 53, atomic wt. 126.90447; used in the manufacture of iodine compounds and as a catalyst, reagent, tracer, constituent of radiographic contrast media, topical antiseptic, antidote for alkaloidal poisons, and in certain stains and solutions; formerly used for prophylaxis of iodine deficiency.
[G. iōdēs, violet-like, fr. ion, a violet, + eidos, form]

iodine

/io·dine/ (I) (i´ah-dīn) chemical element, at. no. 53; it is essential in nutrition, being necessary for synthesis of the thyroid hormones thyroxine and triiodothyronine. Iodine solution is used as a topical antiinfective. See also radioiodine.
protein-bound iodine  iodine firmly bound to protein in the serum, determination of which constitutes one test of thyroid function.

iodine

(ī′ə-dīn′, -dĭn, -dēn′)
n.
1. Symbol I A lustrous, purple-black, corrosive, poisonous halogen occurring as a diatomic molecule, I2, that easily sublimes to give a purple gas and is a trace element essential for proper thyroid function. Radioactive isotopes, especially I-131, are used as medical tracers and in thyroid disease diagnosis and therapy. Iodine compounds are used as germicides, antiseptics, and dyes. Atomic number 53; atomic weight 126.9045; melting point 113.7°C; boiling point 184.4°C; density of gas 11.27 grams per liter; specific gravity (solid, at 20°C) 4.93; valence 1, 3, 5, 7. See Periodic Table.
2. An antiseptic preparation containing iodine in solution, used to treat wounds.

iodine (I)

[ī′ədīn]
Etymology: Gk, ioeides, violet
a nonmetallic element of the halogen group. Its atomic number is 53; its atomic mass is 126.90. Iodine is a bluish black solid that becomes a violet vapor on heating without going through a liquid phase. Iodine is an essential micronutrient or trace element. Almost 80% of the iodine present in the body is in the thyroid gland, mostly in the form of thyroglobulin. Iodine deficiency can result in goiter or cretinism. Iodine is found in seafood, iodized salt, and some dairy products. It is used as a contrast agent for blood vessels in computed tomography scans. Radioisotopes of iodine are used in radioisotope scanning procedures and in palliative treatment of cancer of the thyroid.

iodum

Homeopathy
A homeopathic remedy used for those with thyroid dysfunction, nonfocused hyperactivity and forgetfulness; it is also used for cardiovascular disease, coughs and laryngitis.

io·dine

(I) (ī'ŏ-dīn, ī'ŏ-dēn)
A nonmetallic chemical element, atomic no. 53, atomic wt. 126.90447; used as a catalyst, reagent, tracer, constituent of radiographic contrast media, therapy in thyroid disease, antidote for alkaloidal poisons, and component of some stains and solutions.
[G. iōdēs, violet-like, fr. ion, a violet, + eidos, form]

iodine

A halogen element which, in small quantities, is an essential component of the diet. Iodine is poisonous in excess and is sometimes used in an alcoholic or aqueous potassium iodide solution as an antiseptic. The radioactive isotope, iodine 131, is extensively used for thyroid imaging and thyroid function tests. The drug is on the WHO official list.

iodine

necessary in the diet (as iodides) for the production of the the iodine-containing hormones of the thyroid gland. Deficiency causes hypothyroidism: when severe, in childhood, retarded development (cretinism) and in later life myxoedema .

iodine

; I element with topical antiseptic, antifungal and rubefacient properties; essential for normal thyroid function

iodine (īˑ·ō·dīn),

n an element/mineral used in the synthesis of thyroid hormones and whose deficiency is implicated in preventable mental retardation and brain maldevelopment. Iodine is present in kelp and seafood, with the most common supplemental source being iodized table salt.

antiseptic 

An agent that kills or prevents the growth of bacteria. This term is generally restricted to agents that are sufficiently non-toxic for superficial application to living tissues. These include the preservatives for eye drops and contact lens solutions. Examples of antiseptics are alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide, chlorbutanol, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, thimerosal (or thiomersalate). Other agents that are too toxic to be applied to living tissues are called disinfectants and are used to sterilize instruments and apparatus. See disinfection; ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid; neutralization; sterilization.

io·dine

(I) (ī'ō-dīn, ī'ŏ-dēn)
A nonmetallic chemical element, used in manufacture of iodine compounds and as a catalyst, reagent, or tracer among other purposes.
[G. iōdēs, violet-like, fr. ion, a violet, + eidos, form]

iodine (I) (ī´ədīn´),

n a halogen element that is nonmetallic in nature; atomic weight is 126.91. As a nutritional element, iodine is vital to the production of thyroxin by the thyroid gland. In radioactive form, iodine is used as a diagnostic substance to determine the ability of the thyroid gland to take up iodine. In tincture form, iodine is used as a locally applied antiseptic, germicide, and disclosing solution.
iodine number,
n the amount of iodine absorbable by 100 g of a fat or an oil; the lower the level of unsaturated fatty acids in the fat or oil, the higher the iodine number.
iodine, protein-bound (PBI),
n the iodine bound to protein, mainly thyroxin in the plasma. The thyroid hormone is precipitated by protein-denaturing agents, and, in general, the amount of iodine in a protein precipitate indicates the amount of thyroid hormone present and is thus an index of thyroid activity. Various values are given for thyroid function: hypothyroidism, 0 to 3.5 mg/ml of protein-bound iodine; euthyroidism, 3.5 to 8 mg/ml; hyperthyroidism, values higher than 8 mg/ml.

iodine

a chemical element, atomic number 53, atomic weight 126.904, symbol I. See Table 6. Iodine is essential in nutrition, being especially prevalent in the colloid of the thyroid gland. It is used in the treatment of hypothyroidism and as a topical antiseptic. Iodine is a frequent cause of poisoning. See also iodism.

iodine-125
a radioisotope of iodine having a half-life of 60 days and a principal gamma-ray photon energy of 28 keV; used as a label in radioimmunoassays and other in vitro tests, and also for thyroid imaging. Symbol 125I.
123iodine-metaiodobenzylguanidine
a radioisotope which concentrates in chromaffin cells; used in diagnostic scintigraphy, e.g. in cases of pheochromocytoma.
iodine-131
a radioisotope of iodine having a half-life of 8.1 days and a principal gamma-ray photon energy of 364 keV; used in treatment of hyperthyroidism and carcinoma of the thyroid, in thyroid function testing, and in imaging of the thyroid gland and other organs. Symbol 131I.
iodine deficiency
may occur in all species under certain conditions; in dogs and cats, a factor in all-meat diets. See also goiter.
iodine contrast agents
iodine salts are opaque to x-rays; therefore they can be combined with other compounds and used as contrast media in diagnostic x-ray examinations.
iodine nutritional deficiency
is characterized by goiter, neonatal mortality and alopecia.
iodine poisoning
occurs usually due to accidental overdosing. It causes lacrimation, anorexia, coughing due to bronchopneumonia, and a heavy dandruff. Paradoxically, iodine excess may result in thyroid hyperplasia and goiter, especially in the young.
protein-bound iodine
a test of thyroid function. See also protein-bound iodine (PBI) test.
radioactive iodine
see iodine-125, iodine-131 (above).
iodine residues in milk
careless use of iodine-based teat dips results in unacceptable residues of iodine in milk.
iodine solution
contains 2% free iodine and 2.4% sodium iodide in an aqueous solution.
iodine solution (strong)
contains 5% free iodine and 10% potassium iodide in an aqueous solution.
tamed iodine
iodine trapping
the selective absorption of iodine from the circulation by the thyroid gland.