Twelve-Step Program

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Twelve-Step Program

Any program modelled after the 12-step self-help-group program used by Alcoholics Anonymous for rehabilitating alcoholics; central to all such programs is the belief in a God, transpersonal spiritual form of energy or superhuman power.

12-step programs have been developed for those with cocaine abuse, emotional lability (Emotions Anonymous), obesity (Overeaters Anonymous), sexual addiction (Sexaholics Anonymous) and others.

Twelve-Step Program

Addiction disorders Any program modeled after the 12-step self-help-group programs used for rehabilitating alcoholics, Alcoholics Anonymous; central to all 12-SPs is the belief in a God, transpersonal spiritual form of energy, or superhuman power

twelve-step program,

n group programs that treat problems such as alcoholism by completing twelve tasks. Participants gain self-acceptance and share experiences. Twelve-step programs traditionally ask members to rely on a power greater than their own.
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Bickerton notes that by following the 12 steps one step at a time, a business can be better positioned to build its online reputation.
The project was hinged on the 12 steps, a simple programme first used by Alcoholics Anonymous in America around 80 years ago.
But for each of the 12 steps, there is a biblical comparison to ponder.
Synopsis: "How To Find A Great Job In The Great Recession: 12 Steps to Make it Happen
If all a treatment program does is give people an expensive introduction to the 12 Steps, it is just as inadequate as providing only MAT.
The specific issue mentioned repeatedly is that of "powerlessness," which is detailed in the first step of the 12 steps.
Integrating 12 steps and psychotherapy; helping clients find sobriety and recovery.
Again connecting the 12 steps with the Gospel, Rohr says powerlessness is the place where Jesus encountered many during his ministry
But many elements of the 12- step programme are a part of recovery programmes, even though people may not follow the exact 12 steps.
One approach involved actively screening sponsors for most youths in their programs by: (a) meeting with new sponsors to review treatment rules, program expectations, and confidentiality (Site A); (b) talking with sponsors to ensure they had a good understanding of the 12 steps, had actually worked the steps themselves, had their own sponsor, were appropriate, and were "not going to take advantage of the client" (Sites A and F); and (c) encouraging good role models or adult sponsors to come to "in-house" 12-Step meetings in order to connect with youths in treatment (Site F).
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That doesn't meet AA's requirement, and the 12 Steps don't square with the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting free exercise thereof.